Aviation Tales, this is my story:

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Propnut
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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#81

Post by Propnut » Tue Nov 06, 2012 11:37 am

We will wait in anticipation for the next installment.  :cheers:


Still trying to catch the gravy train.

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Re: Aviation Tales - This is my story . . . .

#82

Post by avi-addict » Wed Nov 07, 2012 9:45 am

[quote="Moertoe Pilut"]
You want me to put all the stories under this thread?
[/quote]

Munts I was thinking of a whole new topic, but as you have it now, it works fine.


Guys, just remember (sorry  ::) to explain abbreviations in brackets.  Otherwise I'll make a list and have it explained later.


If you can't convince them, confuse them or cast a spell over them.  I'm the witch, then there's the cat and the broom . . .

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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#83

Post by avi-addict » Wed Nov 07, 2012 9:47 am

Just remember members - stories from the passenger's side is also welcome.  Any aviation/airport related tales will do. 


If you can't convince them, confuse them or cast a spell over them.  I'm the witch, then there's the cat and the broom . . .

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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#84

Post by avi-addict » Wed Nov 07, 2012 9:48 am

Just remember members - stories from the passenger's side is also welcome.  Any aviation/airport/air show experience/sightings related tales will do.


If you can't convince them, confuse them or cast a spell over them.  I'm the witch, then there's the cat and the broom . . .

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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#85

Post by avi-addict » Wed Nov 07, 2012 10:05 am

BINGO!!!    ONS  WAG  VIR  JOU  STORIES!!!!


If you can't convince them, confuse them or cast a spell over them.  I'm the witch, then there's the cat and the broom . . .

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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#86

Post by Raffles » Wed Nov 07, 2012 1:52 pm

I had to deliver a Bonanza to a farmer in the Cape somewhere, (this was before GPS), they gave me the co-ords and off I went using map reading as my method of navigation. I got to what appeared to be the runway, overflew some farm buildings to warn them I was there, did a runway inspection. It seemed very short and there were puddles of water, but anyway. I landed using carrier type technique and dodging the puddles. I waited and waited, eventually a farmer arrived in his bakkie and explained that I was on the wrong farm and told me how to get to the correct farm. I asked him what plane he was opreating from his runway as it was veeerrrryyy short and bumpy. He says to me, "Microlight"  :yikes:


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#87

Post by avi-addict » Sun Nov 11, 2012 9:55 am

"I asked him what plane he was opreating from his runway as it was veeerrrryyy short and bumpy. He says to me, "Microlight" 


Raffles. this is called "SKILL". . . .however quite funny  :funny:  sorry Raffles, can't stop giggle  :pml:  this is very funny in a cute way.....sorry but ..... :funny: :funny: :outtahere: :hide:............askies!    :pml:


If you can't convince them, confuse them or cast a spell over them.  I'm the witch, then there's the cat and the broom . . .

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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#88

Post by Millie7 » Sun Nov 11, 2012 12:55 pm

Don't worry Antie Avi - I also couldn't stop laughing when I read that last sentence.  :pml:



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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#89

Post by Pine » Sun Nov 11, 2012 1:07 pm

Could have been worse.  The farmer's son could have used the piece of level ground as a run-up to get his kite in the air................ :funny: :funny:  :hide:


Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.

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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#90

Post by Raffles » Sun Nov 11, 2012 2:47 pm

I still had to take off out of there again....


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#91

Post by Pine » Sun Nov 11, 2012 4:30 pm

[quote="Raffles"]
I still had to take off out of there again....
[/quote]

That's actually what I was wondering about...............

How did you manage that? What did you do to that poor Bonanza?  :whistle:


Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.

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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#92

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Sun Nov 11, 2012 6:23 pm

Soft field/short field take off?


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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#93

Post by Raffles » Sun Nov 11, 2012 7:23 pm

Follow the book soft/short field takeoff procedure and dodge the bad bits. Not much else you can do. I was only one-up so it wasn't too bad.


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Too much fuel...

#94

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Wed Nov 14, 2012 2:53 am

Foreword:
Before I start this story, I have to tell you that this took place in the years that there wasn't a Safety Management System in place, let alone a Non Punitive Reporting System. In fact, the Captain on this flight and myself, previously worked for airlines were you would be "punished" for anything that didn't work out according to the company's plan or if it would induce extra costs etc or if you would do something unnecessary.

Image


Too much fuel….

In early 2000, we did a flight on a DC-8-62 from Ostend, Belgium to Hermosillo, Mexico. We left Ostend late at night and flew to Gander, Newfoundland for a fuel stop. After departing Newfoundland we continued to Ypsilanti, Michigan where we spend the night. After our crew rest we departed again and set course for our final destination, Hermosillo. When we arrived there, I set our DC-8 up for refuelling, for our return trip the next day. The flight back to Ostend required full fuel, 74,000kg's, as it would be a non-stop flight back.

I had calculated how many litres were required and had opened up all our tank valves (fill valves) so that the airplane could be fuelled up. There wasn't really a point for us to stay around and wait for the fuelling company to complete the fuelling, as everything was set up and the uplift in litres would be verified the next morning, so we left for the hotel.

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The next morning I verified the fuel uplift in litres delivered, against litres required and the amount checked out perfectly, all fuel tank gauges were showing full and the dripsticks also confirmed we had full fuel onboard . I did a walk around (exterior preflight check) and then completed the flight preparations upstairs behind my Flight Engineers panel. We were airborne 30 minutes later for our nonstop flight back to Ostend,Belgium, which would be a flying time of 12 hours and 20 minutes.

When we reached top of climb, I checked the fuel remaining and found out we burned too much fuel compared to what we normally would, especially since the airplane was empty. I advised the Captain of it and told him I would check again on the first hour into the flight. After the first hour of flight, we still were burning way too much fuel. We decided to monitor it closely towards the second hour of flight.

On the fuel check I carried out for the second hour of flight, it became clear that there was something very wrong. The airplane was either burning excessive fuel or even worse, leaking fuel somewhere. The Captain decided to call the company via HF radio and inform them of our problem, as with the rate we were burning/loosing fuel, we would not be able to cross the Atlantic Ocean. The company had made arrangements for us to land at Boston and Gander if needed.

While the Captain was on the radio, I went to the back of the airplane and looked out the emergency exit window over both wings. When I got to the left wing, I could see fuel running out of the number 2 tank overwing access panel, at quite a rapid rate. I went back to the flight deck and informed the Captain on what I saw and told him I would start burning/transferring fuel out of that tank, in the hope we could contain the fuel loss.

After removing a few tons of fuel out of that tank, the Captain and I took turns to go back and look out the window again to see if the airplane was still leaking fuel out of the overwing tank access panel. We both couldn't see fuel coming out of the panel anymore. We continued monitoring the fuel against the flight plan and we finally started to catch up on fuel burn again. We got to the point were we actually started to burn far less then the flight plan had predicted. Based upon that, we decided to cross the Atlantic and continue the flight to destination.

As the flight progressed, we got to the point were we had more fuel remaining then the computerised flight plan predicted we would. So as we got closer to Ostend, we would land with a lot of fuel. It would actually look as if we cried wolf when we called the company over the HF radio. I calculated that we would land with an excess of over 12Tons of fuel, were the flight plan would predict 9 Tons. Both the Captain and myself were not in the mood to get "punished" over something like this, so we decided to get rid of some fuel in order not to make it look as if we didn't loose fuel at all.

The Captain ordered the Load Master to take away the cockpit trash and secure the galley (diversion so the L/M wouldn't know what we were about to do). As he left I started to dump fuel, using the dump motor. We managed to dump around 2000Kg's while we flew over the North sea. When we finished dumping to the "stand pipe" of 10,000Kg's, I retracted the dump chute again, using the motor. It retracted halfway and stopped… So I had to pull the circuit breaker on the dump motor and retract the chute manually (crank sits in the F/E desk). With all my might I tried to retract the chute but I couldn't get it past the "drain" position. We had to leave the chutes were they were, the airplane couldn't dump fuel anymore then we had already done, so we landed like that.

Luckily after we landed, I found my brother being the mechanic on duty for that evening. I asked him to have a look outside and check if the dump chutes were fully retracted. He came back and said that they didn't. He said not to worry, he will have a look at it and let me know and also let us know what they found that caused our fuel leak.

The fuel leak was caused by having only 2 screws inserted into the overwing tank access panel, the rest were MISSING. The day before we left, a contracting fuel tank repair company had worked on our aircraft to fix fuel leaks, they had forgotten to install the access panel properly. As for the dump chute, the cable got jammed in one of the pulleys (something that happened also on another flight when the crew needed to dump fuel). We never got questioned by the company about our fuel loss (they never found out we dumped), they actually gave us feed back on what had happened and how it was caused. It was only then that I realised that not all these operators are the same and it was a pretty dumb idea to dump fuel….


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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#95

Post by avi-addict » Wed Nov 14, 2012 9:16 pm

:bingo:  How do we say in good old Afrikaans?  "Kul jou hier, en kul jou daar en SIEDAAR!!" :whistle:

Ah and this time you foiled old 'MURPHY" for having your brother in the right place!  How lucky can one be?! :burner:


If you can't convince them, confuse them or cast a spell over them.  I'm the witch, then there's the cat and the broom . . .

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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#96

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Wed Nov 14, 2012 9:25 pm

[quote="avi-addict"]How lucky can one be?! :burner:[/quote]More like how stupid can one be....


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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#97

Post by bmused55 » Tue Apr 09, 2013 9:09 pm

Some excellent stories here. Moertoe, raffles, HS, you could all write a book! I'm sure it'd sell well.

I only have SLF tales to share.

In 2004 i boarded a Beech 1900D  as the only passenger on a flight from West Palm beach in Florida to Nassau, Bahamas. It was getting dark as we took off and was dark by the time we began the approach into Nassau. The pilots had left the curtain to the flight deck open so I was enjoying watching them work. I became aware of a black wall getting ever closer through the windshield.  As we flew into the "wall" we dropped what seemed like a few feet and shook around quite a bit. The orange master caution lights flashed and were quickly put out by the F/O, a rather lovely blonde lady. I went back to the immigratiion slip I hand been handed and completed it. I looked up to see another "wall" approach. Again we seemed to drop and got a good shaking. The master caution lights flashed again. The crew turned them off again and continued the approach. Then as we made a turn to the left the blackest, darkest "wall" of them all stood in our way. I tighted my grip on the seat handles.

Oh boy, did we get shaken about. The left wing seemed to drop, which was corrected, then we got rattled up and down violently. I actually lifted from my seat! As I "landed" back in my seat,I tightened my belt some more then looked up. Now the red master warning lights were flashing, followed quickly by all the electronic gizmos flickering off. I saw the captain reach  up to the overhead, flick a couple of switches and turn a dial knob. The warning lights went out and the electronic gizmos slowly came back to life. After a firm landing I asked the crew what went on, explaining that I'm not too ignorant of what they do. The captain explained tthat the number two generator had gone off line, hence the red lights and the electronic gizmos going off. He then showed me how he had switched the load to the number one gen.


Apart from that, the only story I have is how when our Excel Airways 738 landed earky in Newcastle airport and we began a long, long taxi. The captain came on the PA with:

"Well ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls. We've managed to land a full 35 mintes ealier than scheduled. This seems to have ticked off the airport manager for ruining his carefully planned schedule. As a punishment he's sent us to the farthest possible parking spot. So please stay seated with your seatbelts on, I still may prang this thing yet and end up parking it in a ditch."
Many of us laughed at that. Its always nic to get a funny announement.



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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#98

Post by Raffles » Tue Apr 09, 2013 10:39 pm

Thanks for sharing Sandy! It can be more nerve wracking flying as SLF, especially when the crew aren't up to scratch.


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#99

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Wed Nov 25, 2015 1:57 am

Fly for R0,10 cents….

A while back I flew a 727 freighter in order for me to stay current on the 727 at the time. As luck has it, every time I flew for this company something would happen to the airplane. This flight was no different, needless to say. We left CPT for JNB and all was fine and well. In fact we had made up some time so that we would be be back in CPT ahead of schedule.

We had just finished loading up the airplane with the CPT freight when the F/E was closing the cargo door. He was swearing a few times, reset some circuit breakers and than he was swearing some more. Amused by his actions I decided to have a look to see what was going on. He showed me that the locking sequence of the pins was out and one of the locking actuators was leaking hydraulics. Great another one of these flights…

I called their operations and advised them that we couldn’t leave because the damn door wouldn’t close. I asked them to “borrow” an actuator of another 727 freighter for the airplane but apparently that door wasn’t the same as ours and no spares were available that night (I do remember we had he same door on one of our DC-8s).

The F/E and I decided to take the leaking actuator apart and see why and what the problem was (this was after being now delayed for 2 hours). After having a close look it appeared that the back end of the cylinder had a tiny crack and that’s where the hydraulics were leaking out of (the hydraulics used on this door was 5606, mineral oil based but still pumping it out at 1500PSI IIRCC). Since the cylinder was hollow and only used to store hydraulic fluid, I decided to test out something.

I took a R0,10 cent coin out of my wallet and pushed it in to the cylinder. It stayed in place…. We then decided to put the actuator back on and give it a try. After re-installing it we opened the cargo door fully and closed it again. This time the sequence was right and all pins locked into place AND no leak. To make sure we tried it a few more times, opening and closing the door and every time it closed and locked with no leaks. The whole crew was satisfied with the 10 cent repair and we decided to take the airplane back to CPT.

Maintenance refused to sign off the airplane with our “cheap repair”. We tried to explain to them once the door is locked and the pins are all in, the system is no longer pressurised and it could not open the door in flight. Still they weren’t convinced and said they wouldn’t sign out the repair with that 10 cent coin. Well, we never wrote the defect in the technical log (we honestly forgot and were too busy trying to get out of JNB), THEY however had already signed off the tech log (without the defect obviously).

Again after a long talk with them they finally agreed that we could go. We finally left JNB 3 hours after scheduled departure and made up some time on the way down (flying close to Mmo, quickest JNB-CPT I’ve ever done). The following night we arrived back in JNB and they replaced the actuator. Were we stupid? Was it unwise? Not IMHO, if you know your systems, you can make a plan.

Next up:

- No airspeed
- No brakes
- Raffles’ 2 engine ferry



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Re: Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#100

Post by Bell 407 » Wed Nov 25, 2015 6:59 am

Thanks for posting Moertoe, very interesting indeed for 2 reasons: (1) that a damn 10c piece actually worked and it only cost you 10c to fix the actuator; and (2) from the issue of did you act reckelessly or carelessly? I suppose you were the PiC and made the call so that stands. Sometimes you have to make a decision either way and stick with it :thinking:



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