Aviation Tales, this is my story:

Discuss aviation related topics, rumors and gossip here. Leave News for the "Aviation News" section.
User avatar
happyskipper
Taxying Poster
Posts: 862
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Durban
Contact:
Mozambique

Re: Flying with "The Russians"

#41

Postby happyskipper » Thu Sep 27, 2012 11:39 am

Thanks, Pine - bearing in mind that I was only ever a Private Pilot (never got my Comm due to medical issues) - but I still worked in flight ops for several airlines, and did a lot of para-dropping to build hours for Comm......
Oh, and my Dad flew for the Air Force and airlines, whilst my brother was a SAAF ATC and Parabat - so in my family, we have lots of aviation stories - I can bore you for hours on end......if I can remember them.... :gooneybird:

User avatar
Moertoe Pilut
2000 feet Poster
Posts: 2914
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2012 12:00 am
Location: In a cockpit....
Contact:
Netherlands

Re: Flying with "The Russians"

#42

Postby Moertoe Pilut » Thu Sep 27, 2012 11:48 am

Thanks HS, I enjoyed that, looking forward to more horror stories from your trips with the Russians, I'm sure Skypirate will enjoy it also. I flew with them once, on an IL-62 in Libya. It was a VIP configuration and just like your crew, nobody up front spoke English, the only one that spoke English was the radio operator who sat in the back, in a small office...

Pine I will also try to keep them coming from the freight side, busy with one which will be called "Royal Water", might have it ready later today.
Image

User avatar
four engine jock
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 379
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 12:00 am
Location: My Office
Cuba

Re: Flying with "The Russians"

#43

Postby four engine jock » Thu Sep 27, 2012 12:20 pm

Nice one Skipper. All this is bringing back lots of memories.

User avatar
Pine
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 148
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Cape Town
South Africa

Re: Flying with "The Russians"

#44

Postby Pine » Thu Sep 27, 2012 12:36 pm

[quote=""happyskipper""]Thanks, Pine - bearing in mind that I was only ever a Private Pilot (never got my Comm due to medical issues) - but I still worked in flight ops for several airlines, and did a lot of para-dropping to build hours for Comm......
Oh, and my Dad flew for the Air Force and airlines, whilst my brother was a SAAF ATC and Parabat - so in my family, we have lots of aviation stories - [size=99px]I can bore you for hours on end[/size]......if I can remember them.... :gooneybird:[/quote]

I'd love to be on the receiving end of your efforts :thumbs: :thumbs:

Well, you got your PPL.................I almost didn't make it to my kite-licence after I broke the first one and nobody wanted to help me building a new one...... :twisted: :twisted:
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.

User avatar
Pine
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 148
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Cape Town
South Africa

Re: "Freight Dog Fatigue"

#45

Postby Pine » Thu Sep 27, 2012 12:45 pm

[quote=""four engine jock""]I remember those days very well.
Back then we did many things we would never do today.
Muntu and I have been through many things together.
To talk about fatigue.

I[size=99px]Muntu and I could write a book about some of things we did together in the old days as Fright Dogs. I will never forget it as it was some of the best times flying I ever had[/size].[/quote]

We would love to hear and read FEJ.

What I posted on another thread:

Re: Flying with "The Russians"Post Number:#2 Posted: 27 Sep 2012 11:13

HS thank you very much for sharing this. It sounds like quite a close encounter of "some other" kind. Glad you're still here to share it.

That brings me to something else. I'm sure that guys like yourself, Muntu, Raffles, FEJ, Burner, Gooneybird and others have great stories to tell from your own flying experiences. To people, like me, Avi, Millie and a lot of others, who have a great interest in aviation, but only fly as pax from time to time, this is very interesting and also exciting stuff.

My request: Don't you guys want to share more of these experiences with us?
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.

User avatar
Moertoe Pilut
2000 feet Poster
Posts: 2914
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2012 12:00 am
Location: In a cockpit....
Contact:
Netherlands

Re: "Freight Dog Fatigue"

#46

Postby Moertoe Pilut » Thu Sep 27, 2012 12:51 pm

I'll try to post a story at least once a week. Most of the stuff we did was years ago and I can't really remember it all, or maybe trying not to remember it :bingo:
Image

User avatar
Pine
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 148
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Cape Town
South Africa

Re: "Freight Dog Fatigue"

#47

Postby Pine » Thu Sep 27, 2012 12:58 pm

[quote=""Muntu Pilut""]I'll try to post a story at least once a week. Most of the stuff we did was years ago and I can't really remember it all, or maybe trying not to remember it :bingo:[/quote]


The second reason I'll buy. The first one...............nog so mooi jonk!! :bingo:
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.

User avatar
happyskipper
Taxying Poster
Posts: 862
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Durban
Contact:
Mozambique

Re: Flying with "The Russians"

#48

Postby happyskipper » Thu Sep 27, 2012 3:05 pm

Thanks for the encouragement ........ next installment:

10 March 1994, our Herc operating on the LWF contract in Kenya suffered a major engine problem, and landed in Nairobi on 3 engines. The LWF threatened to cancel the contract if the Herc was not able to operate within 2 days. Thus, motivated by money, we again used the AN 32 to save the day. We managed to squeeze a Herc engine into the hold, with a few minor ancillary items removed. By midday, we were ready to depart for Nairobi. (The An32 has a wonderful overhead crane mounted on a beam running the full length of the cargo hold, and extends to the end of the ramp).

I was given a US $ cash float and the crew S&T money, and warned (by their Chief Pilot) not to give them the cash until we were airborne on the last leg of the round trip, otherwise I might be faced with a crew of Vodka-swilling drunks with no inclination to fly anywhere. Or worse - wanting to fly anyway.....

Well, with one delay and the next, we arrived in Lilongwe for a tech-stop at midnight. We refueled and continued to Nairobi, arriving there at 4am the following day. We bribed a guy in order to use his cherry-picker for the engine change (The Herc had a system of slings for doing an engine change without the use of a crane - but it takes hours to accomplish). We got the engineers sorted, and myself and the crew headed for the Silver Springs hotel in Nairobi.

On arrival at the hotel, I went for breakfast, before retiring for the next 8 hours. The Russians, had breakfast, accompanied by Vodka (of course), and retired only around 10am.

After sleeping the sleep of the dead, I went out to change some US $ for local currency, and went to the tourism centre to buy meat for a braai that evening.

We had the crew of the Herc, myself and the five Russians (They added a Captain Melnichenko to the cockpit crew because of the long trip) staying at the hotel, so we convinced the staff to allow us to have a braai on the back veranda of the hotel. This confused the Russians no end - after all, only peasants cook on an open fire when there's a perfectly good restaurant available)

Needless to say we converted these guys to our way of thinking, and they enjoyed the braai tremendously. The steaks were huge slabs of meat which we had to cut in half so they could fit on the half-drum braai......... simply huge.... Also large amounts of White Cap beer and the local whiskey were consumed..........

The loadmaster on the Herc was a non-drinker, and retired early to sleep. Which was interrupted rudely when we sent a local hooker up to his room, saying that he would pay her afterwards.........
I still don't know the result of that prank.....

Anyway, early the next morning, with the Herc already airborne to places North, we traipsed out to the Antanov, bleary-eyed and not looking forward to the next eight hours in the noisy, vibrating bucket of bolts.


After having to bribe the "Ramp Agent" to call the fuel bowser (which was standing twenty metres away, but would only refuel us if the necessary "fee" was paid), we again refuelled and climbed aboard.

The #2 engine wouldn't start, and so they started #1, then the engineer climbed onto the running engine's cowling and removed the ignitor, and installed it on engine #2. Nice - if we did have an engine problem, there was no way of restarting #1 in the air....

Stopped in Lilongwe again, and paid the crew's S&T (which was more money than they saw back in the Ukrain in a whole year), so that they could stock up for the flight back to JHB. (Cashew nuts and stuff - NO Vodka allowed)

We landed late that afternoon, having spent a total of 16 hours and 15 minutes in the air..........

I only stopped shaking and rattling two days later........

User avatar
Moertoe Pilut
2000 feet Poster
Posts: 2914
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2012 12:00 am
Location: In a cockpit....
Contact:
Netherlands

Re: Flying with "The Russians"

#49

Postby Moertoe Pilut » Thu Sep 27, 2012 3:21 pm

Geez that's pretty bad if their own Chief Pilot has to warn you not to give them the cash otherwise they'll drink it all, HS! :lollol: When you guys left NBO, were they sober?
Image

User avatar
happyskipper
Taxying Poster
Posts: 862
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Durban
Contact:
Mozambique

Re: Flying with "The Russians"

#50

Postby happyskipper » Thu Sep 27, 2012 5:43 pm

[quote=""Muntu Pilut""]Geez that's pretty bad if their own Chief Pilot has to warn you not to give them the cash otherwise they'll drink it all, HS! :lollol: When you guys left NBO, were they sober?[/quote]
Well they (we) had all stopped before the 8-hour bottle-throttle time, but I wouldn't guarantee that some people's blood-alcohol level wasn't over the legal limit...... :avi:

User avatar
Burner
Engine Starting Poster
Posts: 57
Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 7:48 pm
Location: Somewhere on contract

Re: Flying with "The Russians"

#51

Postby Burner » Thu Sep 27, 2012 7:38 pm

Wow HS hair raising stuff! I've heard some shocking stuff said on the radio in Afghan by the Russian crews. The chopper guys are worse than the fixed wing, but not by much. Not nice flying an ILS down to minimas (1200m in Kabul), and having "Ivan" and the crew flying a 2 ship SVFR approach onto the parallel taxiway, and they line up with the runway instead of the taxiway...

I guess the dollar is king, seeing how the bulk of civvy freight operators are EX Soviet Block. Man are those controllers in Afghan patient!

User avatar
Pine
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 148
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Cape Town
South Africa

Re: Flying with "The Russians"

#52

Postby Pine » Thu Sep 27, 2012 9:14 pm

These Russians are a "strange" lot :shock:

HS thanks for sharing this. I find it very interesting reading :thumbs:
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.

User avatar
Raffles
Site Admin
Posts: 3532
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Die K@K Plaas
Contact:
Burkina Faso

Re: Flying with "The Russians"

#53

Postby Raffles » Fri Sep 28, 2012 12:03 am

I found the Russians who worked with us in PNR to be very nice and sociable people. They got you P$%sdronk by 7pm :bingo: Seriously they braaied with us and in fact there was one Russian hostie who was a damn good looker. :wow: I should have offered her S.A. citizenship :bingo: They let us fly right seat in their YAK-42 and we let them fly our 727. It is not uncommon for them to take a vodka during the flight. "Russian Tradition!"...
Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

User avatar
knobbies
Engine Starting Poster
Posts: 68
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Here and there

Re: Flying with "The Russians"

#54

Postby knobbies » Fri Sep 28, 2012 7:22 am

[quote=""Raffles""]It is not uncommon for them to take a vodka during the flight. "Russian Tradition!"...[/quote]
I flew in the back of an AN-24 from Maputo to Beira and it was like a Goon show script.

The UN had insisted on cargo nets, seats with seatbelts (!) and actually departing on
schedule and the result was quite funny....
Once the cargo was loaded and the pax were on board, the net was applied to the load,
(presumably so we could all see compliance with the rules)... 2 crewmen arrived with a net
they had removed off a pallet and draped it neatly over the cargo, after all the UN wanted
a net, they never asked for it to be tied down (that came later)....

On to the briefing..... Captain arrived, resplendent in his uniform consisting of pilot's shirt
with bars, shorts and flip flops, whistles loudly to get us all to shut up and pay attention and
pronounces.."You sit down, you put belt, no smoke, and if we crash, you do this" and he
crouches down with his head between his arms looking like someone is shooting at him. :pml:

With that, he disappears into the cockpit and slams the door and in about 3 minutes, the APU
and both donks are up and making smoke. 5 minutes later we are airborne and en-route to
Beira, most of us wondering what the hell just happened. During climb out we hit some
turbulence and the cockpit door comes open and we see the crew passing a bottle of Vodka
around for a while until they realise the door is open when they slam it shut again.

I found out later that they used to leave the APU running for the flight because the thrust it
generated cut the flight time down to about 30 minutes less than the Herc could do it in. :anyone:
I watched an AN-24 taxi with just the APU running, much to my amazement.

User avatar
Pine
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 148
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Cape Town
South Africa

Re: Flying with "The Russians"

#55

Postby Pine » Fri Sep 28, 2012 7:54 am

Raffles, so that's why you think they are "nice and sociable"............because of that hostie :whistle: :bingo:

Still think they're a strange lot :grin:
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.

User avatar
Raffles
Site Admin
Posts: 3532
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Die K@K Plaas
Contact:
Burkina Faso

Re: Flying with "The Russians"

#56

Postby Raffles » Fri Sep 28, 2012 8:27 am

[quote=""knobbies""]

I found out later that they used to leave the APU running for the flight because the thrust it
generated cut the flight time down to about 30 minutes less than the Herc could do it in. :anyone:
I watched an AN-24 taxi with just the APU running, much to my amazement.[/quote]

True. They can increase takeoff weight if they use the APU thrust for takeoff. I think it is the An24 and An26 that have this feature. The guys used to refer to it as the third engine.
Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

User avatar
Moertoe Pilut
2000 feet Poster
Posts: 2914
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2012 12:00 am
Location: In a cockpit....
Contact:
Netherlands

Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#57

Postby Moertoe Pilut » Sun Sep 30, 2012 4:30 pm

Home Made "Flow Control":


Image


The "airline" I used to work for had a very hands-on owner. He was quite the inventor when it came to the DC-8. The airplanes were both registered in Liberia and needles to say, there was no need for FAA approved STC's. He would just modify the airplane himself and I have to admit, he had some pretty good idea's.

The DC-8 came standard with 4 "turbo compressors" (TC's) which were located in the nose scoop of the airplane. As far as I can remember, each turbo compressor costed around $30,000, quite expensive if you had to replace one. Well thats where the owner's "skills" came in.

Image
DC-8 Nose Scoops


He had previously build a basic "turbo compressor" (TC) but instead of using turbines and moving parts he had an aluminium box, which looked like a "sputnik rocket". The "Sputnik" as we called it, was a box with a spiral in it. Ram Air would come in from the front over the spiral and would meet up with the engine's Bleed air from the back. At the middle section of the "Sputnik", there was a tap off which then would be used as "compressed" air for air conditioning and pressurisation.


Image
Home made "Sputnik" design



As far as I can remember we had one airplane in operation and one was in the hangar having basically a D-Check done to it. The owner wanted this airplane to be "a zero time" airplane, which till today, I still don't understand what he meant with that.

We started out with one "Sputnik" and three TC's. That worked out to be ok, we were still able to control the Cabin during descend.


As far as I remember, the airplane in the hangar had one Sputnik, two TC's and one "Turbo Charger" fitted. The "Turbo Charger" came off a truck. He had designed and build an oil reservoir and pump for it and was also fitted into the airplanes "scoop" area. After years of work on this airplane, it was time for its maiden "test flight". Yours truly managed to bullsh!t his way out of going on the flight.

The airplane took off on an mid afternoon, for a planned 2 hour test flight. The guys who had worked on the airplane, including myself, stayed by the hangar to wait for the airplane to come back, so we could do further work on it if necessary.

Well the airplane returned after about 30 minutes of flight, which of course wasn't a good sign for us. The owner himself was also onboard during this test flight. The crew parked the airplane back by the hangar and the owner opened the main cabin door. As the door opened you could clearly see blue smoke coming out of the airplane.

The owner being rather upset, explained that the "Turbo Charger" had packed up and spit all the oil out, hence the blue smoke coming out of the airplane. So the turbo charger was removed and another "Sputnik" was fitted. It was back to the drawing board for the "Turbo Charger" and the owner.

A few months later, he had upgraded the "Turbo Charger" and it was re-fitted on the airplane. Although it was slightly better than its original test flight, the Turbo Charger would only last about 30 minutes before it ran out of oil again. The design never quite made it.

In the end the airplane ended up with one TC and three Sputniks. Controlling the cabin on this airplane was a nightmare. During descend we had to fly with the number 2 and 3 engine on part power in order to get enough bleed air through the Sputnik. We ended up planning our descends around 130Nm's out…

I left the "airline" in 1998 and they ceased operating the DC-8's in 1999 I think.
Image

User avatar
four engine jock
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 379
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 12:00 am
Location: My Office
Cuba

Aviation Tales, this is my story:

#58

Postby four engine jock » Sun Sep 30, 2012 5:49 pm

Captain you missed the taxiway:

Here is a story on how we missed the taxiway.
On flight from Ostend Belgium to Keflavik Iceland one night on a B707-300C as we used to do many times during the Salmon season.
On this flight Muntu and I were together. I was the FE and Muntu was the GE. If I remember correctly he had a broken hand at the time.
During the approach we were told that braking action was medium to good.
The landing was pretty good and the aircraft stopped pretty good considering that we were empty at the time. The tower gave us the taxi instruction and told us to turn on taxi way ?? ( I don’t remember), when we passed that taxiway the copilot told the Captain that he missed the taxi way. Captain turned us and said,,,, I did not miss it I CANT STOP THE AIRCRAFT.
He put all four engines in reverse and still could not stop and went into the grass. Lucky for us the grass was frozen.
Muntu and me went down the Lower 41( That’s the electronic compartment door) and what we found was that the Taxiway was like an ICE RINK.
They brought a tug to tow us in and as you would expect the tug could not tow us in as the tires just kept spinning. The funny part was that the brought another tug to tow the tug that was towing the aircraft.

I will try to remember more.

User avatar
happyskipper
Taxying Poster
Posts: 862
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Durban
Contact:
Mozambique

Re: Home Made "Flow Control"

#59

Postby happyskipper » Sun Sep 30, 2012 6:38 pm

:shock: That must have been interesting, flying these "home built" Dc-8s

User avatar
Moertoe Pilut
2000 feet Poster
Posts: 2914
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2012 12:00 am
Location: In a cockpit....
Contact:
Netherlands

Re: Home Made "Flow Control"

#60

Postby Moertoe Pilut » Sun Sep 30, 2012 6:48 pm

Very interesting. I'm waiting for a friend of mine to come back to me with details when he lost a whole reverser cascade door during climb out (weighing around 120Kgs), due to a home build mistake....
Image


Return to “Being Talked About”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest