Today in aviation history

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Richard Cranium
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Eastern 401

#81

Post by Richard Cranium » Sun Dec 29, 2013 2:13 pm

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Today marks the anniversary of the crash of Eastern Airlines 401 on December 29th, 1972. For full details on this crash, please visit the "Official Eastern Airlines Flight 401" page.



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Re: Today in aviation history

#82

Post by Raffles » Sun Dec 29, 2013 3:47 pm

:RIP:


A tragic flying lesson.


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Today in aviation history

#83

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Sun Dec 29, 2013 10:09 pm

A sad and unnecessary loss of life. What intrigues me is the "ghost stories of flight 401".


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Re: Today in aviation history

#84

Post by Pine » Mon Dec 30, 2013 2:32 pm

What a sad, but also interesting story.

Thanks for sharing the link...  :thumbs:


Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.

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Re: Today in aviation history

#85

Post by Raffles » Sat Jan 04, 2014 7:36 am

Another accident happened on this day, will be yesterday by the time you read it :

Status: Final
Date: Saturday 3 January 2004
Time: 04:45
Type:
Boeing 737-3Q8

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Operator: Flash Airlines
Registration: SU-ZCF
C/n / msn: 26283/2383
First flight: 1992-10-09 (11 years 3 months)
Total airframe hrs: 25603
Cycles: 17976
Engines: 2 CFMI CFM56-3C1
Crew: Fatalities: 13 / Occupants: 13
Passengers: Fatalities: 135 / Occupants: 135
Total: Fatalities: 148 / Occupants: 148
Airplane damage: Destroyed
Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location: 15 km (9.4 mls) S off Sharm el Sheikh (Egypt) 
Phase: En route (ENR)
Nature: Domestic Non Scheduled Passenger
Departure airport: Sharm el Sheikh-Ophira Airport (SSH), Egypt
Destination airport: Cairo International Airport (CAI/HECA), Egypt
Flightnumber: 604
Narrative:
Weather was perfect (excellent visibility, 17 degrees C and a light breeze) when Flash Air flight 604 departed the Red Sea resort of Sharm el Sheikh for a flight to Paris-CDG with an intermediate stop at Cairo. On board were 135, mostly French, holidaymakers who were heading home.
At 04:38 the flight was cleared to taxi to runway 22R for departure. After takeoff, at 04:42, the plane climbed and maneuvered for a procedural left turn to intercept the 306 radial from the Sharm el-Sheikh VOR station. When the autopilot was engaged the captain made an exclamation and the autopilot was immediately switched off again. The captain then requested Heading Select to be engaged. The plane then began to bank to the right. The copilot then warned the captain a few times about the fact that the bank angle was increasing. At a bank angle of 40 degrees to the right the captain stated "OK come out". The ailerons returned briefly to neutral before additional aileron movements commanded an increase in the right bank.
The aircraft had reached a maximum altitude of 5460 feet with a 50 degrees bank when the copilot stated: "Overbank". Repeating himself as the bank angle kept increasing. The maximum bank angle recorded was 111 degrees right. Pitch attitude at that time was 43 degrees nose down and altitude was 3470 feet.
The observer on the flight deck, a trainee copilot, called "Retard power, retard power, retard power". Both throttles were moved to idle and the airplane gently seemed to recover from the nose-down, right bank attitude. Speed however increased, causing an overspeed warning. At 04:45 the airplane struck the surface of the water in a 24 degrees right bank, 24 degrees nose-down, at a speed of 416 kts and with a 3,9 G load.
The wreckage sank to a depth of approx. 900 metres.

CONCLUSION: "No conclusive evidence could be found from the findings gathered through this investigation to determin the probable cause. However, based on the work done, it could be concluded that any combination of these findings could have caused or contributed to the accident.
Although the crew at the last stage of this accident attempted to correctly recover, the gravity upset condition with regards to attitude, altitude and speed made this attempt insufficient to achieve a successful recovery."

Courtesy ASN


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Today in aviation history

#86

Post by Kerry R » Mon Jan 13, 2014 8:26 pm

13 January 1982: At 3:59 p.m. EST, Air Florida Flight 90, a Boeing 737-222, N62AF, began its takeoff roll at Washington National Airport. The airliner, with a flight crew of two and three cabin attendants, carried 74 passengers enroute Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with an intermediate stop at Tampa. The departure was delayed 1 hour, 45 minutes when the airport closed due to a snowstorm. When the airport reopened, heavy snow was falling. Snow and ice had accumulated on the airliner’s wings and fuselage. The airplane had previously been de-iced, but the flight crew elected not to repeat the procedure. Further, they did not activate the engine deicing system. During the takeoff, the engines were slow to accelerate and the airplane took much longer than normal to gain flight speed. Though it did become airborne, the 737 reached an altitude of just 352 feet (102 meters) when it stalled and struck the 14th Street Bridge, then crashed into the Potomac River. The airliner broke through the ice covering the river and sank. There were only five survivors.
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Re: Today in aviation history

#87

Post by Raffles » Mon Jan 13, 2014 10:06 pm

That was a classical chain of events and failures.


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Today in aviation history

#88

Post by Raffles » Mon Jan 13, 2014 11:45 pm



Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Today in aviation history

#89

Post by Kerry R » Wed Jan 15, 2014 4:42 pm

15 JANUARY 2009

LANDING IN THE HUDSON
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imDFSnklB0k



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Re: Today in aviation history

#90

Post by Kerry R » Wed Jan 15, 2014 4:46 pm

January 15, 1991

The first hot-air balloon to cross the Pacific Ocean takes off from Japan and eventually lands in Canada.

The "Virgin Atlantic Flyer" flown by Lindstrand and Branson becomes the first hot air balloon to cross the Pacific Ocean. Flying from Japan to Arctic Canada, they achieve a distance of 6,700 miles at speeds up to 245 mph.

2011: A US Air Force General Atomics MQ-1 Predator unmanned aerial vehicle crashes into the sea off the Horn of Africa while trying to return to Djibouti-Ambouli International Airport in Djibouti. It is the first known accident involving either a Predator or an MQ-9 Reaper near a civilian airport.

2002: Lion Air Flight 386 a Boeing 737-200 registered PK-LID, overruns the runway after a rejected takeoff from Sultan Syarif Kasim II Airport in Indonesia. The accident would be blamed on the pilots not having set flaps for takeoff speed, as the aircraft rotated but didn’t liftoff due to the unexpectedly higher speed needed. All 103 on-board survived.

1998: An Ariana Afghan Airlines Antonov An-12BP (YA-DAB), believed to be carrying Taliban fighters, crashes into a mountain in southwest Pakistan while on a flight from Kandahar to Herat. The pilot had reported the plane was running low on fuel. All 51 onboard are killed.

1975: The General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon wins the US Air Force’s Lightweight Fighter competition, beating out designs from Boeing, Lockheed, Northrop and Vought.

1969: A fire on the deck of the USS Enterprise, caused by an exploding rocket on an F-4 Phantom, kills 27 sailors.

1960: First flight of the Piper PA-28 Cherokee.

1958: Qantas becomes the first foreign airline permitted to operate across the United States.

1953: First flight of the Convair F2Y Sea Dart, a Navy fighter plane designed to takeoff and land on water. Only five prototypes would be built and the jet would never enter production, but it remains the first and only seaplane to break the sound barrier.

1950: The first prototype of the MiG-17 makes its maiden flight. Over the next 36 years,over 10,300 would be produced.

1943: President Franklin D. Roosevelt becomes the first sitting U.S. President to fly in an airplane, arriving in Casablanca three days after departing Miami aboard a Pan Am Boeing 314 Flying Boat named Dixie Clipper (NC18605). The trip would take the President through South America and Africa with several fuel stops in between, enroute to the Casablanca Conference in which Roosevelt would discuss war strategy with Winston Churchill and Charles DeGaulle.

1935: United Air Lines decides to install de-icing systems on their fleet’s wings after tests on a Boeing 247.


FDR Becomes First President To Fly: January 14th in Aviation History



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Re: Today in aviation history

#91

Post by Raffles » Wed Jan 15, 2014 8:06 pm

The good old Cherokee!


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Today in aviation history

#92

Post by Kerry R » Wed Jan 22, 2014 3:00 pm

January 21st in Aviation History: First Concorde Passenger Flight, Cargolux Lands on Van and 40 More Events!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bAxk_wfMCeg

2010 – Cargolux Flight 7933, operated by Boeing 747-400 LX-OCV strikes a vehicle on landing at Luxembourg International Airport. The van, which was also given permission by Air Traffic Control to be on the runway, suffered major damage, while the aircraft sustained a damaged tire. Three investigations have been launched into the incident, eventually placing blame on an ATC communication error.
2009 – An Indian Air Force HAL HJT-16 Kiran Mk.2 military trainer aircraft from the No. 52 Squadron Surya Kiran (Sun Rays) Aerobatics display team based at the Bidar Air Force Station in Karnataka, India, crashes into a field during a routine training exercise, killing the pilot.
2004 – NASA’s Mars Exploration Robot-A (MER-A) Spirit ceases communication from the red-planet because of a flash memory issue. The problem would be fixed two days later remotely from Earth.
1999 – A Royal Air Force Panavia Tornado GR-1 crashes into a Cessna 152 II (G-BPZX) near Mattersley, Nottinghamshire. The Air Accident Report concluded that none of the pilots saw each other in time to take avoiding action. Both crew of the Tornado, Flight Lieutenant Greg Hurst and Sottotenete Matteo Di Carlo, as well as the pilot and passenger in the Cessna, were killed.
1999 – A Nicaraguan Air Force Antonov An-26, 126, c/n 14206, crashes into a mountain near Bluefields, Nicaragua, killing all 28 on board.
1991 – An Iraqi surface-to-air missile shoots down a U. S. Navy F-14 Tomcat, and a United States Army attack helicopter is lost to non-combat causes in the Gulf War.
1991 – The Soviet Union commissions the heavy aircraft-carrying missile cruiser “Admiral of the Fleet of the Soviet Union Kuznetsovâ€



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Re: Today in aviation history

#93

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Wed Jan 22, 2014 6:49 pm

[quote="Kerry R"]
15 JANUARY 2009

LANDING IN THE HUDSON
[/quote]Amazing how calm the R/T was done :thumbs:


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Re: Today in aviation history

#94

Post by Raffles » Wed Feb 05, 2014 8:41 pm

Two aviation pioneers passed away on this day (courtesy Wikipedia) :

Ehrenfried Günther Freiherr[1] von Hünefeld (1 May 1892–5 February 1929) was a German aviation pioneer and initiator of the first transatlantic flight from East to West.

James Herman Banning (November 5, 1900 – February 5, 1933) was an American aviation pioneer. In 1932, James Banning, accompanied by Thomas C. Allen, became America's first black aviator to fly coast-to-coast.

Only four months after his historic flight, Banning was killed in a plane crash during an air show at Camp Kearny military base in San Diego on February 5, 1933. He was a passenger in a two-seater Travelaire biplane flown by Navy machinist mate second class Albert Burghardt, who was at the controls because Banning had been refused use of the airplane by an instructor at the Airtech Flying School. After taking off and climbing four-hundred feet, the plane stalled and entered an unrecoverable tailspin in front of hundreds of horrified spectators. Banning was recovered from the wreckage and died one hour later at a local hospital.

One was born on this day:

Gabriel Voisin (February 5, 1880 – December 25, 1973[1]) was an aviation pioneer and the creator of Europe's first manned, engine-powered, heavier-than-air aircraft capable of a sustained (1 km), circular, controlled flight, including take-off and landing, made by Henry Farman on January 13, 1908 near Paris, France. During World War I, Gabriel Voisin became a major producer of military aircraft, notably the Voisin III. Subsequently he switched to the design and production of luxury automobiles under the name Avions Voisin.


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Today in aviation history

#95

Post by Gooneybird » Thu Feb 06, 2014 1:32 pm

MANCHESTER UNITED ACCIDENT 6 Feb 1958

The Munich air disaster occurred on 6 February 1958, when British European Airways flight 609 crashed on its third attempt to take off from a slush-covered runway at Munich-Riem Airport in Munich, West Germany. On the plane was the Manchester United football team, nicknamed the "Busby Babes", along with supporters and journalists.[1] Twenty of the 44 on the aircraft died. The injured, some unconscious, were taken to the Rechts der Isar Hospital in Munich where three more died, resulting in 23 fatalities with 21 survivors.

The football team was returning from a European Cup match in Belgrade, Yugoslavia (now Serbia), against Red Star Belgrade. The flight stopped to refuel in Munich because a non-stop flight from Belgrade to Manchester was out of the "Elizabethan" class Airspeed Ambassador aircraft's range. After refuelling, pilots James Thain and Kenneth Rayment twice abandonded take-off because of boost surging in the left engine. Fearing they would get too far behind schedule, Captain Thain rejected an overnight stay in Munich in favour of a third take-off attempt. By then, snow was falling, causing a layer of slush at the end of the runway. After the aircraft hit the slush, it ploughed through a fence beyond the end of the runway and the left wing was torn off after hitting a house. Fearing the aircraft might explode, Thain began evacuating passengers while Manchester United goalkeeper Harry Gregg helped pull survivors from the wreckage.

An investigation by West German airport authorities originally blamed Thain, saying he did not de-ice the aircraft's wings, despite eyewitness statements to the contrary. It was later established that the crash was caused by slush on the runway, which slowed the plane too much to take-off. Thain was cleared in 1968, ten years after the incident.

Manchester United were trying to become the third club to win three successive English league titles; they were six points behind League leaders Wolverhampton Wanderers with 14 games to go. They also held the Charity Shield and had just advanced into their second successive European Cup semi-final. The team had not been beaten for 11 matches.


I'm ONLY responsible for what I say......NOTwhat you understand !

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Re: Today in aviation history

#96

Post by Raffles » Thu Feb 06, 2014 1:57 pm

Another tragedy :

Birgenair Flight 301 was a flight chartered by Turkish-managed Birgenair partner Alas Nacionales ("National Wings") from Puerto Plata in the Dominican Republic to Frankfurt, Germany, via Gander, Canada, and Berlin, Germany. On 6 February 1996, the Boeing 757-225 operating the route crashed shortly after take-off from Puerto Plata's Gregorio Luperón International Airport.[1][2] There were no survivors at all. The cause was a pitot tube blocked by wasp nests that were built in it as it had been some time since the plane had been on any flights and it was not covered up properly when stored.


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Today in aviation history

#97

Post by Boris the Basher » Tue Mar 25, 2014 4:13 pm

Today I drink to my IL76M for not killing me.


Try that bugamich again with me!

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Re: Today in aviation history

#98

Post by Funboy » Tue Mar 25, 2014 11:37 pm

You are seriously f!@#$%d up man, you need professional help  :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: Fly this baby on vodka... better to drink it...

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"People once believed that when someone dies, a crow carries their soul to the land of the dead. Then sometimes, just sometimes, the crow can bring that soul back--to put the wrong things right."

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Re: Today in aviation history

#99

Post by Boris the Basher » Wed Mar 26, 2014 9:04 pm

Why you talk to like that.... Iam very much professional. Fly vodka every day.. You can fly your Boeing trash... We never lost.


Try that bugamich again with me!

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Re: Today in aviation history

#100

Post by Raffles » Thu Mar 27, 2014 1:12 pm

The world's worst air disaster took place on this day.

Tenerife airport disaster

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Tenerife airport disaster was a fatal collision between two Boeing 747 passenger aircraft which occurred on Sunday, March 27, 1977, on the runway of Los Rodeos Airport (now known as Tenerife North Airport), on the Spanish island of Tenerife, one of the Canary Islands. With a total of 583 fatalities, the crash is the deadliest accident in aviation history.
A bomb explosion at Gran Canaria Airport, and the threat of a second bomb, caused many aircraft to be diverted to Los Rodeos Airport. Among them were KLM Flight 4805 and Pan Am Flight 1736 – the two aircraft involved in the accident. At Los Rodeos Airport, air traffic controllers were forced to park many of the airplanes on the taxiway, thereby blocking it. Further complicating the situation, while authorities waited to reopen Gran Canaria, a dense fog developed at Tenerife, greatly reducing visibility.
When Gran Canaria reopened, the parked aircraft blocking the taxiway at Tenerife required both of the 747s to taxi on the only runway in order to get in position for takeoff. The fog was so thick that neither aircraft could see the other, nor could the controller in the tower see the runway or the two 747s on it. As the airport did not have ground radar, the only means for the controller to identify the location of each airplane was via voice reports over the radio. As a result of several misunderstandings in the ensuing communication, the KLM flight attempted to take off while the Pan Am flight was still on the runway. The resulting collision destroyed both aircraft, killing all 248 aboard the KLM flight and 335 of 396 aboard the Pan Am flight. Sixty-one people aboard the Pan Am flight, including the pilots and flight engineer, survived the disaster.[1]
As the accident occurred in Spanish territory, that nation was responsible for investigating the accident. Investigators from the Netherlands and the United States also participated. The investigation revealed that the primary cause of the accident was the captain of the KLM flight taking off without clearance from Air Traffic Control (ATC).[1] The investigation specified that the captain did not intentionally take off without clearance; rather he fully believed he had clearance to take off due to misunderstandings between his flight crew and ATC.[1] Dutch investigators placed a greater emphasis on this than their American and Spanish counterparts,[2] but ultimately KLM admitted their crew was responsible for the accident, and the airline financially compensated the victims' relatives.[3]
The accident had a lasting influence on the industry, particularly in the area of communication. An increased emphasis was placed on using standardized phraseology in ATC communication by both controllers and pilots alike, thereby reducing the chance for misunderstandings. As part of these changes, the word "takeoff" was removed from general usage, and is only spoken by ATC when actually clearing an aircraft to take off.[4] Less experienced flight crew members were encouraged to challenge their captains when they believed something was not correct, and captains were instructed to listen to their crew and evaluate all decisions in light of crew concerns. This concept was later expanded into what is known today as Crew Resource Management. CRM training is now mandatory for all airline pilots.[5]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenerife_airport_disaster


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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