Today in aviation history

Discuss aviation related topics, rumors and gossip here. Leave News for the "Aviation News" section.
User avatar
Moertoe Pilut
2000 feet Poster
Posts: 2914
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2012 12:00 am
Location: In a cockpit....
Contact:
Netherlands

Re: Today in aviation history

#41

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Thu Feb 14, 2013 12:05 am

Oh wow, we just missed Chuck's birthday.


Image

User avatar
Raffles
Site Admin
Posts: 3607
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Die K@K Plaas
Burkina Faso

Re: Today in aviation history

#42

Post by Raffles » Thu Feb 14, 2013 7:50 am

He will forgive us... 90 years old!


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

User avatar
Raffles
Site Admin
Posts: 3607
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Die K@K Plaas
Burkina Faso

Re: Today in aviation history

#43

Post by Raffles » Sat Feb 16, 2013 4:44 pm

Accident description
Last updated: 16 February 2013
Status: Final
Date: 16 FEB 1998
Time: 20:09
Type: Airbus A300-622R
Operator: China Airlines
Registration: B-1814
C/n / msn: 578
First flight: 1990-10-16 (7 years 4 months)
Total airframe hrs: 20193
Cycles: 8800
Engines: 2 Pratt & Whitney PW4158
Crew: Fatalities: 14 / Occupants: 14
Passengers: Fatalities: 182 / Occupants: 182
Total: Fatalities: 196 / Occupants: 196
Ground casualties: Fatalities: 7
Airplane damage: Destroyed
Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location: Taipei-Chiang Kai Shek International Airport (TPE) (Taiwan) 
Phase: Approach (APR)
Nature: International Scheduled Passenger
Departure airport: Denpasar-Ngurah Rai Bali International Airport (DPS) (DPS/WADD), Indonesia
Destination airport: Taipei-Chiang Kai Shek International Airport (TPE) (TPE/RCTP), Taiwan
Flightnumber: 676
Narrative:
The Airbus carried out a ILS/DME runway 05L approach to Taipei Chiang Kai Shek Airport in light rain and fog when the it came in 1000 feet too high on the glide slope (at 1515 feet, 1,2nm short of the threshold). Go around power was applied 19 seconds later over the threshold (at 1475 feet agl). The gear was raised and the flaps set to 20deg as the Airbus climbed through 1723 feet in a 35-deg pitch-up. Reaching 2751 feet (42.7 deg pitch-up, 45 knots speed) the aircraft stalled. Control couldn't be regained as the aircraft struck the ground 200 feet left off the runway, hit a utility pole and a highway median. It then skidded into several houses, surrounded by fish farms, rice paddies, factories and warehouses, and exploded. Weather was 2400 feet visibility, RVR runway 05L of 3900 feet, 300 feet broken ceiling, 3000 feet overcast.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The investigation team determined that the the following factors combination caused the accident:
1. during all the descent and the approach, the aircraft was higher than the normal path;
2. the crew coordination between the captain and the first officer was inadequate.
3. during 12 seconds, the crew did not counteract the pitch up tendency due to the thrust increase after go around, and then the reaction of the crew was not sufficient.
As a consequence the pitch up increased until the aircraft stalled."


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

User avatar
Moertoe Pilut
2000 feet Poster
Posts: 2914
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2012 12:00 am
Location: In a cockpit....
Contact:
Netherlands

Re: Today in aviation history

#44

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Sat Feb 16, 2013 7:08 pm

Why go try to dodge the actual cause, plain and simple really, it should have read:

Inappropriate Go-Around procedure followed during an Unstable Approach.....


Image

User avatar
Boris the Basher
Engine Starting Poster
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Jun 20, 2012 4:45 am
Location: Minsk, Belarus
Contact:

Today in aviation history

#45

Post by Boris the Basher » Mon Feb 18, 2013 2:47 pm

Today is my birthday , I made history 45 years ago. I fly the first Belarus rocket airspace.


Try that bugamich again with me!

User avatar
Raffles
Site Admin
Posts: 3607
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Die K@K Plaas
Burkina Faso

Re: Today in aviation history

#46

Post by Raffles » Sat Feb 23, 2013 12:23 pm

First flights :

AEA Silver Dart (1909)

Bristol Scout (1914)

Breguet 27 (1929)

Gloster TC.33 (1932)

Lockheed Model 10 Electra (1934)

Polikarpov ITP (1942)

Other events :

Andersen Air Force Base Northrop Grumman B-2 Spririt accident: A United States Air Force B-2 Spirit crashes at Anderson Air Force Base in Guam. It is the first operational loss of a B-2. The crew of two ejects safely, but the aircraft would be the most expensive write-off in history, as each B-2 rings up to around $1.2 billion. The cause of the crash is later determined to have been moisture in the air-data pressure sensors, producing inaccurate speed readings and then an early rotation and subsequent stall.


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

User avatar
Moertoe Pilut
2000 feet Poster
Posts: 2914
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2012 12:00 am
Location: In a cockpit....
Contact:
Netherlands

Re: Today in aviation history

#47

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Sun Feb 24, 2013 9:44 pm

24/02/1989 – United Airlines Flight 811, a Boeing 747, suffers an explosive decompression shortly after takeoff from Honolulu, Hawaii, United States caused by a cargo door which burst open during flight. Of 355 people on board, nine passengers are sucked out of the plane, but the crew manage to land safely at Honolulu.

Image


24/02/1984 – First flight of the Boeing 737-300

Image


24/02/1935 – First flight of the Heinkel He 111

Image


24/02/1921 – First flight of the Douglas Cloudster. It is the first airplane to lift a useful load exceeding its own weight.

Image


Image

User avatar
Raffles
Site Admin
Posts: 3607
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Die K@K Plaas
Burkina Faso

Re: Today in aviation history

#48

Post by Raffles » Sun Feb 24, 2013 9:51 pm

To the nine unfortunate victims  :RIP:


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

User avatar
Raffles
Site Admin
Posts: 3607
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Die K@K Plaas
Burkina Faso

Re: Today in aviation history

#49

Post by Raffles » Mon Mar 04, 2013 7:46 pm

Status: Final
Date: 04 MAR 1966
Time: 20:15
Type: Douglas DC-8-43
Operator: Canadian Pacific Air Lines - CPAL
Registration: CF-CPK
C/n / msn: 45761/237
First flight: 1965
Total airframe hrs: 1792
Engines: 4 Rolls Royce 508-12 Conway
Crew: Fatalities: 10 / Occupants: 10
Passengers: Fatalities: 54 / Occupants: 62
Total: Fatalities: 64 / Occupants: 72
Airplane damage: Written off
Airplane fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location: Tokyo-Haneda Airport (HND) (Japan) 
Phase: Approach (APR)
Nature: International Scheduled Passenger
Departure airport: Hong Kong-Kai Tak International Airport (HKG) (HKG/VHHH), Hong Kong
Destination airport: Tokyo-Haneda Airport (HND) (HND/RJTT), Japan
Flightnumber: 402
Narrative:
Canadian Pacific Flight 402 took off from Hong Kong (HKG) at 16:14 Japan Time for Tokyo (HND). Tokyo was a planned stop on the route to Vancouver, Canada.
At 19:08 the aircraft started its descent from FL250. Because of bad weather at Tokyo, a holding pattern was entered at FL140. At 19:42 the flight crew decided to wait for improvement for 15 minutes. Alternate destination was Taipei. Tokyo ATC reported the runway Visual Range (RVR) to be 2400 feet and cleared the aircraft for an approach. The aircraft descended to 3000 feet, but the weather had worsened again, forcing the crew to divert to Taipei. At 20:05 the flight had reached 11500 feet when Tokyo reported the RVR to be improved to 3000 feet. Tokyo cleared Flight 402 for another GCA approach to runway 33R. At one mile from touchdown the aircraft was 20 feet below the GCA glide path and was instructed to level off momentarily. The aircraft continued to descend however and struck the no.14 approach light, 2800 feet from the runway threshold. The plane then struck a number of other approach lights, crashed against a sea wall and caught fire.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "Pilot misjudged landing approach under unusually difficult weather conditions."


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

User avatar
Raffles
Site Admin
Posts: 3607
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Die K@K Plaas
Burkina Faso

Re: Today in aviation history

#50

Post by Raffles » Wed Mar 06, 2013 8:13 am

Missed this yesterday but it is worthy of note (From Wikipedia):

Supermarine Spitfire

Image

The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries throughout the Second World War. The Spitfire continued to be used as a front line fighter and in secondary roles into the 1950s. It was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft and was the only British fighter in continuous production throughout the war.[5]
The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft[6] by R. J. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works (which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from 1928). Mitchell continued to refine the design until his death from cancer in 1937, whereupon his colleague Joseph Smith became chief designer.[7] Where speed was seen as essential to carrying out the mission of home defence against enemy bombers,[6] the Spitfire's thin cross-section elliptical wing allowed it a higher top speed than several contemporary fighters, including the Hawker Hurricane.[8]
During the Battle of Britain (July–October 1940), the Spitfire was perceived by the public as the RAF fighter, though the more numerous Hawker Hurricane shouldered a greater proportion of the burden against the Luftwaffe. The Spitfire units had a lower attrition rate and a higher victory-to-loss ratio than those flying Hurricanes.[9]
After the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire became the backbone of RAF Fighter Command, and saw action in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific and the South-East Asian theatres. Much loved by its pilots, the Spitfire served in several roles, including interceptor, photo-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber, carrier-based fighter, and trainer. It was built in many variants, using several wing configurations.[10] Although the original airframe was designed to be powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine producing 1,030 hp (768 kW), it was adaptable enough to use increasingly powerful Merlin and later Rolls-Royce Griffon engines producing up to 2,035 hp (1,520 kW).[11]


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

User avatar
Les Nessman
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2012 8:28 am
Location: At the scene.
Wallis and Futuna Islands

Re: Today in aviation history

#51

Post by Les Nessman » Sat Mar 09, 2013 12:13 am

1910 – French aviatrix Raymonde de Laroche became the first woman to receive a pilot's licence.


5 times winner of the Buckeye Newshawk Award.

User avatar
Raffles
Site Admin
Posts: 3607
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Die K@K Plaas
Burkina Faso

Re: Today in aviation history

#52

Post by Raffles » Tue May 07, 2013 9:36 am

I missed this one the other day. On May 3rd, 1952, the first ever jet passenger service landed at Palmietfontein airport. I took the trouble to go to the Johannesburg library and retrieve the original newspaper article in The Star.

Image


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

User avatar
Pine
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 148
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Cape Town
South Africa

Re: Today in aviation history

#53

Post by Pine » Tue May 07, 2013 12:31 pm

Very interesting article, Raffles.

Just compare the time it took them 60 years ago to a flight between Heathrow and ORTIA today.

Another thing............a crowd of 5 000 to 10 000 spectators for such an event in those years was quite a thing..........

Wonder what old "Jan" was thinking of this compared to the months it took him to cover the same distance?  :cheers:


Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.

User avatar
Raffles
Site Admin
Posts: 3607
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Die K@K Plaas
Burkina Faso

Re: Today in aviation history

#54

Post by Raffles » Mon May 13, 2013 3:14 pm

Today 64 years ago (Friday 13th May 1949) the first Canberra flew.


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

User avatar
Les Nessman
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2012 8:28 am
Location: At the scene.
Wallis and Futuna Islands

Diary a sad reminder of tragic 1943 plane crash - Mackay Daily Mercury

#55

Post by Les Nessman » Mon Jun 03, 2013 11:05 am

Diary a sad reminder of tragic 1943 plane crash - Mackay Daily Mercury

Diary a sad reminder of tragic 1943 plane crash
Mackay Daily Mercury

Professor Cutler's father was the one to close the door of the US B-17C Flying Fortress plane just before it took off on June 14, 1943, bound for Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. It crashed minutes later. At a ceremony at the Bakers Creek memorial ...

"June 14, 1943 - what a day and a tragic one," he read.

"Up at 4am and lined up 35 enlisted and two officers to go on the CBA to Moresby for a 6am takeover from Mackay aerodrome.

"The weather was misty.

"At 6.02am just two minutes after I turned my back it crashed into some woods, exploding, killing 40 people with only one saved. Biggest air crash in American air transport history to date."

He said pilot error and poor visibility were to blame.

Source: Diary a sad reminder of tragic 1943 plane crash - Mackay Daily Mercury


5 times winner of the Buckeye Newshawk Award.

User avatar
Raffles
Site Admin
Posts: 3607
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Die K@K Plaas
Burkina Faso

Re: Today in aviation history

#56

Post by Raffles » Thu Jun 06, 2013 9:51 am

D Day June 6 1944

Image


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

User avatar
Les Nessman
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2012 8:28 am
Location: At the scene.
Wallis and Futuna Islands

Re: Today in aviation history

#57

Post by Les Nessman » Thu Jun 06, 2013 9:58 am

The Normandy landings, codenamed Operation Neptune, were the landing operations of the Allied invasion of Normandy, in Operation Overlord, during World War II. The landings commenced on Tuesday, 6 June 1944 (D-Day), beginning at 6:30 am British Double Summer Time (GMT+2). In planning, as for most Allied operations, the term D-Day was used for the day of the actual landing, which was dependent on final approval.
The landings were conducted in two phases: an airborne assault landing of 24,000 British, American and Canadian airborne troops shortly after midnight, and an amphibious landing[4] of Allied infantry and armoured divisions on the coast of France starting at 6:30 am. Surprise was achieved thanks to inclement weather and a comprehensive deception plan implemented in the months before the landings, Operation Bodyguard, to distract German attention from the possibility of landings in Normandy. A key success was to convince Adolf Hitler that the landings would actually occur to the north at the Pas-de-Calais. There were also decoy operations taking place simultaneously with the landings under the codenames Operation Glimmer and Operation Taxable to distract the German forces from the real landing areas.[5]
Supreme Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Forces was General Dwight D. Eisenhower while overall command of ground forces (21st Army Group) was given to General Bernard Montgomery. The operation, planned by a team under Lieutenant-General Frederick Morgan, was the largest amphibious invasion in world history and was executed by land, sea and air elements under direct British-American command with over 160,000[6] soldiers landing on 6 June 1944: 73,000 Americans, 61,715 British and 21,400 Canadians.[7] 195,700[8] Allied naval and merchant navy personnel in over 5,000[6] ships were also involved. The invasion required the transport of soldiers and materiel from the United Kingdom by troop-laden aircraft and ships, the assault landings, air support, naval interdiction of the English Channel and naval fire-support. The landings took place along a 50-mile (80 km) stretch of the Normandy coast divided into five sectors: Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno, and Sword.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D-Day
Image


5 times winner of the Buckeye Newshawk Award.

User avatar
Kerry R
Moderator
Posts: 228
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Houston Texas
South Africa

On This Day: Charles Lindbergh returns home a hero after first ever solo flight across the Atlantic

#58

Post by Kerry R » Fri Jun 14, 2013 3:21 am

June 13: American aviation pioneer Charles Lindbergh returned to New York a hero on this day in 1927 after becoming the first person to fly solo across the Atlantic.

The 25-year-old U.S. Air Mail pilot flew his own single-engine plane, the Spirit of St Louis, 3,600 miles from New Jersey to Paris in a time of 33 and a half hours.

A British Pathé newsreel shows him being welcomed back to the U.S. with a ticker-tape parade along Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue and a flotilla of boats in the harbour.
Lindbergh became an instant celebrity after the feat - which had killed six others who attempted it - earned him a $25,000 prize that had been on offer for eight years.

He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross by U.S. President Calvin Coolidge after the French premier Gaston Doumergue gave him the Legion d’honneur medal.
The former U.S. Army pilot then began a three-month American tour where he visited 48 states and 92 cities, rode 1,290 miles in parades and delivered 147 speeches.

Lindbergh’s newfound fame boosted the reputation of aviation enormously – and quickly helped him earned him millions of dollars in endorsements.

Within the year, the son of a senator by the same name had met the woman he would marry, Anne Morrow, 21, the daughter of an ambassador.

The couple wed in 1929 and had six children together.
But tragedy hit the family in 1932 when their 20-month-old son Charles Jr was abducted from his cot in what was described as the ‘crime of the century’.

They paid a $50,000 ransom, but the kidnappers were faking and the toddler’s body was discovered 12 weeks after he first disappeared.

The abduction prompted the Lindberghs to leave America to ‘seek a safe, secluded residence away from the tremendous public hysteria’.

In December 1935, they boarded a boat under assumed names and sailed to England, eventually settling in the Kent village of Sevenoaks Weald.

Charles Lindbergh - Flight Across the Atlantic



User avatar
Raffles
Site Admin
Posts: 3607
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Die K@K Plaas
Burkina Faso

Re: On This Day: Charles Lindbergh returns home a hero after first ever solo flight across the Atlan

#59

Post by Raffles » Fri Jun 14, 2013 10:09 am

Thanks for posting! It was quite a feat. I believe he nearly fell asleep a couple of times, no autopilot!


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

User avatar
Les Nessman
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2012 8:28 am
Location: At the scene.
Wallis and Futuna Islands

Howard Hughes injured in 1946 plane crash - Los Angeles Times

#60

Post by Les Nessman » Sat Jul 06, 2013 6:23 pm

Howard Hughes injured in 1946 plane crash - Los Angeles Times

In 1943, the Hughes Aircraft Co. received a U.S. Army Air Force contract for 100 F-11 reconnaissance aircraft. But in May 1945, the contract was canceled. Hughes Aircraft was allowed to complete two prototypes.

On July 7, 1946, Howard Hughes took the first prototype on its maiden flight – and crashed. The Los Angeles Times reported the next morning:

Howard Hughes, millionaire airplane manufacturer, oilman, motion-picture producer and one of the most famous civilian pilots aviation has ever known, was injured critically yesterday when he crashed in Beverly Hills while flying his experimental Army photographic plane on its maiden flight.

Hughes, doing his own test-hopping, appeared to have tried to reach the Los Angeles Country Club golf course on which he apparently intended to crash-land the twin-engine airplane.

According to actor Dennis O’Keefe, who witnessed the entire episode from his home at 802 N. Linden Drive, the plane appeared to have been flying at an extremely low altitude, judging from the sound of the approaching engines.

Hughes fell about 300 feet short of the golf course, however, in this treetop-clipping attempt. The gigantic photographic plane, both of its powerful engines whining, tore more than half the roof from a two-story dwelling at 803 N. Linden Drive, occupied by Dr. Jules Zimmerman, a dentist.

Simultaneously the plane’s right wing sliced through the upstairs bedroom of the home next door to Zimmerman’s at 805 N. Linden Drive, narrowly missing the occupants, Jerry De Kamp and his wife Elizabeth, who were in the room at the time.

Caroming off the garage in the rear of the De Kamp residence the XF-11 continued its swath of devastation, slicing through a line of poplar trees bounding the rear of 808 Whittier Drive, the home of Lt. Col. Charles A. Meyer, interpreter at the war crimes trials in Europe, and burst into flames as it crashed into the Meyer home.

One of the plane’s tremendous radial engines, torn from its mounts by the impact, hurtled more than 60 feet through the air, passing through the Meyer home, tearing a gash through the corner of a home at 810 Whittier Drive, owned by Gosta B. Guston, retired Swedish industrialist, and finally came to rest on the Guston lawn.

Hughes was saved from death as the plane exploded into flames by Marine Sgt. William Lloyd Durkin, stationed at the El Toro Marine Base, and Capt. James Guston, 22, son of the industrialist and recently released from the Army….

At 5:25 p.m. yesterday the XF-11, Hughes alone at the controls, lifted easily under the pull of its two eight-bladed counter-rotating propellers. A handful of company officials and newspapermen watched the latest Hughes creation. One hour and 18 minutes later, the ship was a mass of junk which attracted an estimated throng of 8,000 persons to watch its cremation….

Hughes was taken to the Beverly Hills Emergency Hospital and given a “50-50″ chance to live. He survived, and on April 5, 1947 successfully flew the second XF-11 prototype on its first test flight. Seven months later, on Nov. 2, 1947, Hughes piloted the Spruce Goose in its first and only flight.

For more, check out The flight of the Spruce Goose photo gallery.

Source (Go to the article for pictures): Howard Hughes injured in 1946 plane crash - Los Angeles Times


5 times winner of the Buckeye Newshawk Award.

Post Reply