Today in aviation history

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Pine
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Re: Today in aviation history

#101

Post by Pine » Thu Mar 27, 2014 1:47 pm

So often something very tragic must first happen for things to be straightened out.

It is, however, part of progress...

:RIP:


Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.

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Les Nessman
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Re: Today in aviation history

#102

Post by Les Nessman » Sat Apr 12, 2014 1:51 pm

Transbrasil Flight 303

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Transbrasil Flight 303 was a flight from Congonhas-São Paulo Airport in São Paulo, Brazil, to Hercílio Luz International Airport in Florianópolis, Brazil, on April 12, 1980. It crashed on approach to Hercílio Luz International Airport. Only three of the 58 people on board survived.

Aircraft
The aircraft involved was a Boeing 727-27C, registration PT-TYS. It had first flown on August 14, 1966. It was delivered to Braniff Airways, which leased it to Transbrasil in 1975, and sold it to Transbrasil in 1976.

Crash
The aircraft was on a night instrument approach to Hercílio Luz International Airport in a severe thunderstorm when it went off course, struck the hill Morro da Virgínia, and exploded. Probable causes were misjudgment of speed and distance, inadequate flight supervision, failure to initiate a go-around, and improper operation of the engines.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transbrasil_Flight_303


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Les Nessman
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Re: Today in aviation history

#103

Post by Les Nessman » Sat Apr 12, 2014 11:14 pm

TODAY IN HISTORY: Franklin D. Roosevelt, the longest serving U.S. president, died on April 12, 1945. He was 63 years old.

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:RIP:


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Re: Today in aviation history

#104

Post by Raffles » Sat Apr 12, 2014 11:15 pm

R.I.P. Sir!

:utheman:

:RIP:


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Today in aviation history

#105

Post by Raffles » Sun Apr 13, 2014 12:42 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_13

Apollo 13

Apollo 13 was the seventh manned mission in the American Apollo space program and the third intended to land on the Moon. The craft was launched on April 11, 1970, at 13:13 CST from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but the lunar landing was aborted after an oxygen tank exploded two days later, crippling the Service Module (SM) upon which the Command Module (CM) depended. Despite great hardship caused by limited power, loss of cabin heat, shortage of potable water, and the critical need to jerry-rig the carbon dioxide removal system, the crew returned safely to Earth on April 17.

The flight was commanded by James A. Lovell with John L. "Jack" Swigert as Command Module Pilot and Fred W. Haise as Lunar Module Pilot. Swigert was a late replacement for the original CM pilot Ken Mattingly, who was grounded by the flight surgeon after exposure to German measles.


:utheman: :utheman: :utheman:


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Today in aviation history

#106

Post by Boris the Basher » Tue Apr 22, 2014 5:58 pm

Men never landed on moon... I tell you truth.


Try that bugamich again with me!

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Re: Today in aviation history

#107

Post by Raffles » Sat May 03, 2014 12:53 am

May 3, 1952.... The world's first commercial jet service, G-ALYP, a Comet arrived at Palmietfontein airport at 3.38pm,  2 minutes ahead of schedule, to a crowd of 10,000 people. Some advocates have cited Jan Smuts Airport as the locale, but this is a misconception. It is clearly documented in The Star newspaper, which Yours Truly personally retrieved at the Johannesburg library on 2013-04-03.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vkMHJmkx6E8


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Today in aviation history

#108

Post by Raffles » Sun May 11, 2014 9:29 pm

ValuJet Flight 592

Accident

On the afternoon of May 11, 1996, Flight 592 pushed back from gate G2 in Miami after a delay of 1 hour and 4 minutes due to mechanical problems.[1] There were 105 passengers, mainly from Florida and Georgia, on board, as well as a crew of two pilots and three flight attendants, bringing the total number of people on board to 110. At 2:04 pm, 10 minutes before the disaster, the DC-9 took off from runway 9L and began a normal climb.

At 2:10 pm, the pilots heard a loud bang in their headphones and noticed the plane was losing electrical power. The spike in electrical power and the bang were eventually determined to be the result of a tire in the cargo hold exploding. Seconds later, flight attendant Mandy Summers entered the cockpit and advised the flight crew of a fire in the passenger cabin. Passengers' shouts of "fire, fire, fire" were recorded on the cockpit voice recorder when the cockpit door was opened. Though the ValuJet flight attendant manual stated that the cockpit door should not be opened when smoke or other harmful gases might be present in the cabin, the intercom was disabled and there was no other way to inform the pilots of what was happening. The CDR indicated a progressive failure of the DC-9's electrical and flight control systems due to the spreading fire.

Kubeck and Hazen immediately asked air traffic control for a return to Miami due to smoke in the cockpit and cabin, and were given instructions for a return to the airport. One minute later, Hazen requested the nearest available airport. Kubeck began to turn the plane left in preparation for the return to Miami.

Flight 592 disappeared from radar at 2:13:42 pm. Eyewitnesses nearby watched as the plane rolled onto its side and nosedived into the Francis S. Taylor Wildlife Management Area in the Everglades, a few miles west of Miami, at a speed in excess of 507 miles per hour (816 km/h). Control of the plane was completely lost less than 10 seconds prior to impact and examination of debris suggested that the fire burned through the floorboards in the cockpit, resulting in structural failure and damage to cables underneath the instrument panels. However, it was just as likely that the crew had also become incapacitated by smoke and fumes. As power had been lost to the cockpit voice recorder about 55 seconds prior to impact, it was impossible to determine with certainty.[1]

Kubeck, Hazen, the three flight attendants, and all 105 passengers aboard were killed instantly. Recovery of the aircraft and victims was made extremely difficult by the location of the crash. The nearest road of any kind was more than a quarter mile (400 m) away from the crash scene, and the location of the crash itself was a deep-water swamp with a floor made out of solid limestone. The DC-9 was destroyed on impact, with no large pieces of the fuselage remaining. Sawgrass, alligators, and risk of bacterial infection from cuts plagued searchers involved in the recovery effort.

A group of fishermen witnessed the crash and reported that "The plane was flying in a steep right bank, after which it turned so that the nose was facing downward in a nearly vertical angle. It plummeted into the swamp followed by an explosion, shock wave, and a massive geyser of water." They reported seeing no external damage to the DC-9 or any sign of fire or smoke other than the engine exhaust. A group of sightseers in a small private plane also witnessed the crash and provided a nearly identical account, stating that Flight 592 seemed to "disappear" after impacting the swamp and they could see nothing but scattered small debris and part of an engine near the crash site.

Wikipedia : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ValuJet_Flight_592


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Today in aviation history

#109

Post by Les Nessman » Sun May 25, 2014 11:47 am

American Airlines Flight 191

American Airlines Flight 191 was a regularly scheduled passenger flight from O'Hare International Airport in Chicago to Los Angeles International Airport. The McDonnell Douglas DC-10-10 crashed on May 25, 1979, moments after takeoff from Chicago. All 258 passengers and 13 crew on board were killed, along with two people on the ground. It is the deadliest aviation accident to occur on U.S. soil.[note 1]

Investigators found that as the jet was beginning its takeoff rotation, engine number one on the left (port) wing separated and flipped over the top of the wing. As the engine separated from the aircraft, it severed hydraulic fluid lines and damaged the left wing, resulting in a retraction of the slats. As the jet attempted to climb, the left wing stalled while the right wing, with its slats still deployed, continued to produce lift. The jetliner subsequently rolled to the left and reached a bank angle of 112 degrees (partially inverted), before crashing in an open field by a trailer park near the end of the runway. The engine separation was attributed to damage to the pylon rigging structure holding the engine to the wing caused by faulty maintenance procedures at American Airlines.

While maintenance issues and not the actual design of the aircraft were ultimately found responsible for the crash, the accident and subsequent grounding of all DC-10s by the Federal Aviation Administration added to an already unfavorable reputation of the DC-10 aircraft in the eyes of the public caused by several other incidents and accidents involving the type. The investigation also revealed other DC-10s with damage caused by the same faulty maintenance procedure. The faulty procedure was banned, and the aircraft type went on to have a long passenger career. It has since found a second career as a cargo airplane.

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Courtesy Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Airlines_Flight_191


:RIP:


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Re: Today in aviation history

#110

Post by Kerry R » Tue Apr 14, 2015 4:43 am

12Th April 1988

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — The pilot of an old DC-3 aircraft reported fire on board before the plane smashed into a field, killing 13 top South Africa jockeys and 10 trainers and horse racing officials, an official said today.

The twin-engine aircraft was taking the racing officials to a race meeting near Johannesburg when it crashed overnight near the railroad town of Henneman, 155 miles southwest of here.

Bodies and wreckage, including the jockeys' riding equipment, were strewn over a wide area. Witnesses said the gruesome scene was lit by burning corn set afire by the crash and a subsequent explosion.

The race meeting at Newmarket where they had been due to ride today was cancelled and will be held later as a benefit for the bereaved families.
The fuel booster pumps ruptured

The racing industry will honour the memory of those who perished in the Hennenman air disaster at Turffontein today. It is 25 years since the worst tragedy to hit South African horseracing devastated the lives of so many people involved.
Annual Commemoration
The Turffontein raceday is held annually in memory of those who died on Tuesday 12 April 1988 when a United Airways charter flight crashed near the Free State town of Hennenman on its return from a racemeeting in Bloemfontein.

The meeting was due to have been held the previous week, with the racing party booked to travel on a scheduled South African Airways flight.

But when rain forced the postponement of the meeting, SAA couldn’t accommodate a booking change and a plane was specially chartered to transport jockeys and officials to Bloemfontein and back again.

Later, the logbook of the aged United Airways Dakota revealed that it had not been properly serviced and maintained. Fuel leaked and a fire started in the starboard engine, later spreading to the fuselage. The subsequent inquiry failed to pin blame for the disaster on anyone, with United Airways having gone into liquidation in the interim.
Clyde Reflects
Phumelela Executive Clyde Basel, who lost his brother Keith in the tragedy, recalls what happened: “I recall that the plane departed from Bloemfontein Airport at around 19h00. At approximately 19h45 the pilot made contact with the control tower and told them that there was smoke on board the plane. If I remember correctly, the owner of the Hennenman farm where the plane ended up crashing, said that he saw a ball of fire in the sky shortly before the disaster. It is assumed the pilot was overcome by the smoke,â€



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Re: Today in aviation history

#111

Post by Raffles » Tue Apr 14, 2015 1:33 pm

:RIP:

Jakob Kalt used to fly for Namib Air and left just before I joined.


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Today in aviation history

#112

Post by avi-addict » Thu Apr 16, 2015 10:36 am

[quote="Kerry R"]
12Th April 1988

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — The pilot of an old DC-3 aircraft reported fire on board before the plane smashed into a field, killing 13 top South Africa jockeys and 10 trainers and horse racing officials, an official said today.

The twin-engine aircraft was taking the racing officials to a race meeting near Johannesburg when it crashed overnight near the railroad town of Henneman, 155 miles southwest of here.

Bodies and wreckage, including the jockeys' riding equipment, were strewn over a wide area. Witnesses said the gruesome scene was lit by burning corn set afire by the crash and a subsequent explosion.

The race meeting at Newmarket where they had been due to ride today was cancelled and will be held later as a benefit for the bereaved families.
The fuel booster pumps ruptured

The racing industry will honour the memory of those who perished in the Hennenman air disaster at Turffontein today. It is 25 years since the worst tragedy to hit South African horseracing devastated the lives of so many people involved.
Annual Commemoration
The Turffontein raceday is held annually in memory of those who died on Tuesday 12 April 1988 when a United Airways charter flight crashed near the Free State town of Hennenman on its return from a racemeeting in Bloemfontein.

The meeting was due to have been held the previous week, with the racing party booked to travel on a scheduled South African Airways flight.

But when rain forced the postponement of the meeting, SAA couldn’t accommodate a booking change and a plane was specially chartered to transport jockeys and officials to Bloemfontein and back again.

Later, the logbook of the aged United Airways Dakota revealed that it had not been properly serviced and maintained. Fuel leaked and a fire started in the starboard engine, later spreading to the fuselage. The subsequent inquiry failed to pin blame for the disaster on anyone, with United Airways having gone into liquidation in the interim.
Clyde Reflects
Phumelela Executive Clyde Basel, who lost his brother Keith in the tragedy, recalls what happened: “I recall that the plane departed from Bloemfontein Airport at around 19h00. At approximately 19h45 the pilot made contact with the control tower and told them that there was smoke on board the plane. If I remember correctly, the owner of the Hennenman farm where the plane ended up crashing, said that he saw a ball of fire in the sky shortly before the disaster. It is assumed the pilot was overcome by the smoke,â€


If you can't convince them, confuse them or cast a spell over them.  I'm the witch, then there's the cat and the broom . . .

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Re: Today in aviation history

#113

Post by Raffles » Tue Apr 21, 2015 12:07 pm

Image

Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen (2 May 1892 – 21 April 1918), also widely known as the Red Baron, was a German fighter pilot with the Imperial German Army Air Service (Luftstreitkräfte) during the First World War. He is considered the top ace of the war, being officially credited with 80 air combat victories.

Originally a cavalryman, Richthofen transferred to the Air Service in 1915, becoming one of the first members of Jasta 2 in 1916. He quickly distinguished himself as a fighter pilot, and during 1917 became leader of Jasta 11 and then the larger unit Jagdgeschwader 1 (better known as the "Flying Circus"). By 1918, he was regarded as a national hero in Germany, and widely respected even by his enemies.

Richthofen was shot down and killed near Amiens on 21 April 1918. There has been considerable discussion and debate regarding aspects of his career, especially the circumstances of his death. He remains perhaps the most widely known fighter pilot of all time, and has been the subject of many books, films and other media.
{Wikipedia}


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Re: Today in aviation history

#114

Post by Raffles » Wed Jun 24, 2015 3:38 pm

Eastern Airlines Flight 66

Eastern Air Lines Flight 66, a Boeing 727-225 operated as a scheduled passenger flight from New Orleans to New York-JFK. The flight departed New Orleans about 13:19. It proceeded on an IFR flight plan. Eastern 66 arrived in the New York City terminal area without reported difficulty, and, beginning at 15:35:11, Kennedy approach control provided radar vectors to sequence the flight with other traffic and to position it for an ILS approach to runway 22L at the Kennedy airport. The automatic terminal information service (ATIS) reported: "Kennedy weather, VFR, sky partially obscured, estimated ceiling 4,000 broken, 5 miles with haze... wind 210° at 10, altimeter 30.15, Expect vectors to an ILS runway 22L, landing runway 22L, departures are off 22R... "

Read more at Aviation Safety Network


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1956 Grand Canyon mid-air collision

#115

Post by Raffles » Tue Jun 30, 2015 5:45 pm

1956 Grand Canyon mid-air collision

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Image courtesy Wikipedia. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.


The 1956 Grand Canyon mid-air collision occurred on Saturday, June 30, 1956 at 10:30 am Pacific Standard Time when a United Airlines Douglas DC-7 struck a Trans World Airlines Lockheed L-1049 Super Constellation over the Grand Canyon in Arizona, resulting in the crash of both airliners. All 128 on board both flights perished. It was the first commercial airline crash to result in more than 100 deaths, and led to sweeping changes in the control of flights in the United States. The location of the crash has been designated a National Historic Landmark.

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