Today in aviation history

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Re: Today in aviation history

#61

Post by Raffles » Tue Jul 09, 2013 3:41 pm

This anniversary was 2 days ago ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roswell_UFO_incident

Roswell UFO incident

The Roswell UFO incident took place in the U.S. in 1947, when an airborne object crashed on a ranch near Roswell, New Mexico, on July 7, 1947. Explanations of what took place are based on both official and unofficial communications. Although the crash is attributed to a U.S. military surveillance balloon by the U.S. government, the most famous explanation of what occurred is that the object was a spacecraft containing extraterrestrial life. Since the late 1970s, the Roswell incident has been the subject of much controversy, and conspiracy theories have arisen about the event.
The United States Armed Forces maintains that what was recovered near Roswell was debris from the crash of an experimental high-altitude surveillance balloon belonging to what was then a classified (top secret) program named Mogul. In contrast, many UFO proponents maintain that an alien craft was found, its occupants were captured, and that the military engaged in a massive cover-up. The Roswell incident has turned into a widely known pop culture phenomenon, making the name "Roswell" synonymous with UFOs. Roswell has become the most publicized of all alleged UFO incidents.
On July 8, 1947, the Roswell Army Air Field (RAAF) public information officer Walter Haut, issued a press release stating that personnel from the field's 509th Operations Group had recovered a "flying disk", which had crashed on a ranch near Roswell. Later that day, the press reported that Commanding General of the Eighth Air Force Roger Ramey had stated that a weather balloon was recovered by the RAAF personnel. A press conference was held, featuring debris (foil, rubber and wood) said to be from the crashed object, which seemed to confirm its description as a weather balloon.
Subsequently the incident faded from the attention of UFO researchers for over 30 years. In 1978, physicist and ufologist Stanton T. Friedman interviewed Major Jesse Marcel who was involved with the original recovery of the debris in 1947. Marcel expressed his belief that the military covered up the recovery of an alien spacecraft. His story spread through UFO circles, being featured in some UFO documentaries at the time. In February 1980, the National Enquirer ran its own interview with Marcel, garnering national and worldwide attention for the Roswell incident. Additional witnesses added significant new details, including claims of a large-scale military operation dedicated to recovering alien craft and aliens themselves, at as many as 11 crash sites, and alleged witness intimidation. In 1989, former mortician Glenn Dennis put forth a detailed personal account, wherein he claimed alien autopsies were carried out at the Roswell base.
In response to these reports, and after United States congressional inquiries, the General Accounting Office launched an inquiry and directed the Office of the United States Secretary of the Air Force to conduct an internal investigation. The result was summarized in two reports. The first, released in 1995, concluded that the reported recovered material in 1947 was likely debris from Project Mogul. The second report, released in 1997, concluded reports of recovered alien bodies were likely a combination of innocently transformed memories of military accidents involving injured or killed personnel, innocently transformed memories of the recovery of anthropomorphic dummies in military programs like Operation High Dive conducted in the 1950s, and hoaxes perpetrated by various witnesses and UFO proponents. The psychological effects of time compression and confusion about when events occurred explained the discrepancy with the years in question. These reports were dismissed by UFO proponents as being either disinformation or simply implausible. But at the same time, several high-profile UFO researchers discounted the possibility that the incident had anything to do with aliens.


Hindsight is what you see from the tail gunner's position. :D

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Re: Today in aviation history

#62

Post by Raffles » Thu Jul 11, 2013 5:37 pm

Nigeria Airways Flight 2120

Nigeria Airways Flight 2120 was a scheduled flight from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, to Sokoto, Nigeria. On 11 July 1991, the aircraft serving this flight, a Douglas DC-8, registration C-GMXQ, operated by Nationair, crashed after takeoff from King Abdulaziz International Airport, killing all 261 people on board.[1][2]

Source: Wikipedia


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Re: Today in aviation history

#63

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Sun Jul 14, 2013 11:51 am

[quote="Raffles"]
Nigeria Airways Flight 2120

Nigeria Airways Flight 2120 was a scheduled flight from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, to Sokoto, Nigeria. On 11 July 1991, the aircraft serving this flight, a Douglas DC-8, registration C-GMXQ, operated by Nationair, crashed after takeoff from King Abdulaziz International Airport, killing all 261 people on board.[1][2]

Source: Wikipedia
[/quote]More details of the Nation Air 2120 here.


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Re: Today in aviation history

#64

Post by Les Nessman » Sat Jul 20, 2013 6:19 pm



5 times winner of the Buckeye Newshawk Award.

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Re: Today in aviation history

#65

Post by Raffles » Sat Jul 20, 2013 6:23 pm

Salute!  :utheman: :utheman: :utheman:


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Re: Today in aviation history

#66

Post by Les Nessman » Thu Aug 29, 2013 9:35 pm

first flight of the DC-10

  • Role Wide-body jet airliner
  • National origin United States
  • Manufacturer McDonnell Douglas
  • First flight August 29, 1970
  • Introduction August 5, 1971 with American Airlines
  • Status In service, mainly as cargo aircraft
  • Primary users FedEx Express
  • Biman Bangladesh Airlines
  • Kelowna Flightcraft Air Charter
  • Produced 1968–1988
  • Number built DC-10: 386[1]
  • KC-10: 60[1]
  • Variants McDonnell Douglas KC-10 Extender
  • Developed into McDonnell Douglas MD-11


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Re: Today in aviation history

#67

Post by Les Nessman » Sat Aug 31, 2013 9:22 am

27 Years ago today: On 31 August 1986 an Aeromexico DC-9 collided with a Piper 28 over Cerritos, CA, USA and crashed, killing 82 people

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19860831-0

:RIP:


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Re: Today in aviation history

#68

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Sun Sep 01, 2013 6:57 pm

I remember there was a similar crash with a light aircraft and a 727.....


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Re: Today in aviation history

#69

Post by Raffles » Sun Sep 01, 2013 7:03 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PSA_Flight_182

A frightening event to say the least.

:RIP:


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Re: Today in aviation history

#70

Post by Raffles » Sun Sep 01, 2013 8:25 pm

Another spine chilling event : On this day 1983 – Soviet jet interceptors shot down the civilian airliner Korean Air Lines Flight 007 near Sakhalin Island in the North Pacific, killing all 246 passengers and 23 crew on board.

:RIP:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_Air_Lines_Flight_007


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Re: Today in aviation history

#71

Post by Kerry R » Fri Oct 04, 2013 3:42 pm




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Re: Today in aviation history

#72

Post by Raffles » Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:28 pm

:RIP:


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Re: Today in aviation history

#73

Post by Kerry R » Mon Oct 07, 2013 1:51 pm

On This Day: World's oldest airline KLM founded
The Dutch firm's initial flight from Amsterdam to London established the first scheduled route – and the service has continued at least once a week except during World War II

OCTOBER 7, 1919: The world’s oldest airline KLM was founded on this day in 1919 – and the Dutch national flag carrier quickly established itself as an aviation pioneer.

Its initial flight from Amsterdam to London established the first scheduled route – and the service has continued at least once a week except during World War II.

In 1924 – three years before American Charles Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic – KLM broke new ground by flying to the former Dutch colony of Indonesia.

Unlike today, when a direct flight to Jakarta takes 15 hours, the 7,000-mile trip then took a week and had to be completed in several stages.

Yet this soon-to-be-scheduled service still represented a tremendous advance on the three-week journey by sea.

The airline, founded by military flying ace Albert Plesman, also introduced to the world the concept of glamorous air hostesses.

A British Pathé newsreel from 1939 shows one of these elegant women, who today would be called flight attendants, arriving at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport.

Among her tasks, she familiarised herself with that day’s currency exchange rates – which were important since most of the passengers were businessmen.

Wearing smart hat, skirt, jacket and tie, she and her colleagues then check the food on the plane, before ushering the travellers on board.

Scenes also show her serving coffee and providing blankets to passengers offering a glimpse of an adventure few then could even dream of.

Yet within a year of the newsreel being made, Europe was instead consumed by the nightmare of World War II.

Long-running: A KLM Boeing 747 aircraft in 1971. (Rex)When Germany invaded Holland on May 10, 1940, KLM – whose Dutch initials stand for Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschappij, or “Royal Aviation Societyâ€



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Re: Today in aviation history

#74

Post by Pine » Mon Oct 07, 2013 2:12 pm

[quote="Kerry R"]
On This Day: World's oldest airline KLM founded
The Dutch firm's initial flight from Amsterdam to London established the first scheduled route – and the service has continued at least once a week except during World War II

OCTOBER 7, 1919: The world’s oldest airline KLM was founded on this day in 1919 – and the Dutch national flag carrier quickly established itself as an aviation pioneer.

Today it carries 22million passengers a year – compared with just 345 in its first 12 months – and 650,000 tonnes of cargo, compared to 20 tonnes in 1919.[/quote]


What an incredible growth...............  :thumbs:  :thumbs:


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Re: Today in aviation history

#75

Post by Raffles » Mon Oct 07, 2013 2:15 pm

Amazing! KLM  :utheman:


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Re: Today in aviation history

#76

Post by Kerry R » Thu Oct 10, 2013 11:25 pm

Oct. 10, 1933: First commercial plane crash blamed on sabotage
The TSA and airport security seem normal now, but there used to be a time when no plane had ever crashed because of a bomb or sabotage. That all ended Oct. 10, 1933, when a United Airlines Boeing 247 crashed near Charleston, Ind., after a bomb in the storage area above the toilet exploded.

The flight was carrying just four passengers and three crew members as it traveled from New Jersey to Oakland, Calif. It had landed in Cleveland and was on its way to Chicago when it exploded shortly after 9 p.m. Eyewitnesses saw and heard a second explosion after the plane crashed into a wooded area outside Charleston.

Although planes had crashed before, none had been proven to crash because of a deliberate attack. The FBI conducted an investigation into this crash and ruled that it was caused by a nitroglycerine explosive device. The plane, the investigation found, had been ripped apart from somewhere in its rear half, with the tail landing a half-mile away from the front and the toilet blown outward.

Despite the explosion’s significance as the first of its kind — and even though travelers across the country followed the investigation — no suspect was ever found, and the case was never solved.

Source:http://travel.yahoo.com/blogs/compass/oct-10-1933-first-commercial-plane-crash-blamed-173827457.html



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Re: Today in aviation history

#77

Post by Raffles » Fri Oct 11, 2013 2:12 am

When I was a kid you could almost walk up to the planes at Louis Botha Airport, The first movie "Airport" showed how easy it was to take an explosive device onto a plane.


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Re: Today in aviation history

#78

Post by knobbies » Tue Oct 22, 2013 7:25 am

Peripherally related to flying.......

Oct 22, 1797:
The first parachutist
The first parachute jump of note is made by André-Jacques Garnerin from a hydrogen balloon 3,200 feet above Paris.

Leonardo da Vinci conceived the idea of the parachute in his writings, and the Frenchman Louis-Sebastien Lenormand fashioned a kind of parachute out of two umbrellas and jumped from a tree in 1783, but André-Jacques Garnerin was the first to design and test parachutes capable of slowing a man's fall from a high altitude.

Garnerin first conceived of the possibility of using air resistance to slow an individual's fall from a high altitude while a prisoner during the French Revolution. Although he never employed a parachute to escape from the high ramparts of the Hungarian prison where he spent three years, Garnerin never lost interest in the concept of the parachute. In 1797, he completed his first parachute, a canopy 23 feet in diameter and attached to a basket with suspension lines.

On October 22, 1797, Garnerin attached the parachute to a hydrogen balloon and ascended to an altitude of 3,200 feet. He then clambered into the basket and severed the parachute from the balloon. As he failed to include an air vent at the top of the prototype, Garnerin oscillated wildly in his descent, but he landed shaken but unhurt half a mile from the balloon's takeoff site. In 1799, Garnerin's wife, Jeanne-Genevieve, became the first female parachutist. In 1802, Garnerin made a spectacular jump from 8,000 feet during an exhibition in England. He died in a balloon accident in 1823 while preparing to test a new parachute.



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Re: Today in aviation history

#79

Post by Raffles » Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:01 am

Amazing, more than 100 years before powered flight.


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Re: Today in aviation history

#80

Post by Pine » Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:30 am

Verry interesting, Knobbies.  :thumbs:

Its truely amazing what this guy went through and the trouble he went about.................just to jump from the air.  :yikes:


PS:  Gooneybird should also find this interesting.............unless he knows it already.


Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.

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