25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

Adult humour. Aircraft/cockpit guess quizzes.
User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#1

Postby johntrekker » Thu Sep 17, 2015 11:30 am

1: NASA M2-F1

Image

The NASA M2-F1 was a lightweight, unpowered prototype aircraft, developed to flight test the wingless lifting body concept. It looked like a "flying bathtub," and was designated the M2-F1, the "M" referring to "manned" and "F" referring to "flight" version. In 1962, NASA Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body prototype. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#2

Postby johntrekker » Thu Sep 17, 2015 11:51 am

2: Edgley Optica

Image

The Edgley EA-7 Optica is a British light aircraft designed for slow-speed observation work, and intended as a low-cost alternative to helicopters. The Optica has a cruise speed of 130 km/h (70 kn; 81 mph) and a stall speed of 108 km/h (58 kn; 67 mph).

User avatar
Raffles
Site Admin
Posts: 3513
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:00 am
Location: Die K@K Plaas
Contact:
Burkina Faso

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#3

Postby Raffles » Fri Sep 18, 2015 9:34 am

I think the UK police used the Optica for observation. One of them crashed.

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#4

Postby johntrekker » Sun Sep 20, 2015 11:18 am

3: NASA AD-1


Image

The NASA AD-1 was both an aircraft and an associated flight test program conducted between 1979 and 1982 at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards California, which successfully demonstrated an aircraft wing that could be pivoted obliquely from zero to 60 degrees during flight.

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#5

Postby johntrekker » Sun Sep 20, 2015 11:26 am

4: Transavia PL-12 Airtruk

Image


The Transavia PL-12 Airtruk is a single-engine agricultural aircraft designed and built by the Transavia Corporation in Australia. The Airtruk is a shoulder-wing strut braced sesquiplane of all-metal construction, with the cockpit mounted above a tractor engine and short pod fuselage with rear door. The engine cowling, rear fuselage and top decking are of fibreglass. It has a tricycle undercarriage, the main units of which are carried on stub wings. It has twin tail booms with two unconnected tails. Its first flight was in 22 April 1965, and was certified on 10 February 1966

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#6

Postby johntrekker » Sun Sep 20, 2015 11:40 am

5: Lun-class Ekranoplan

Image


The Lun-class ekranoplan (NATO reporting name Duck) is a ground effect vehicle (GEV) designed by Rostislav Evgenievich Alexeyev and used by the Soviet and Russian navies from 1987 until sometime in the late 1990s.

It flew using the lift generated by the ground effect of its large wings when close to the surface of the water–about 4 metres (13 ft) or less. Although they might look similar and have related technical characteristics, ekranoplans like the Lun are not aircraft, seaplanes, hovercraft, nor hydrofoils–ground effect is a separate technology altogether. The International Maritime Organization classifies these vehicles as maritime ships.

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#7

Postby johntrekker » Tue Sep 29, 2015 6:18 pm

6: Scaled Composites Model 281 Proteus

Image

The Scaled Composites Model 281 Proteus is a tandem-wing high-endurance aircraft designed by Burt Rutan to investigate the use of aircraft as high altitude telecommunications relays. The Proteus is actually a multi-mission vehicle, able to carry various payloads on a ventral pylon. An extremely efficient design, the Proteus can orbit a point at over 65,000 feet (19,800 m) for more than 18 hours. It is currently owned by Northrop Grumman.

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#8

Postby johntrekker » Sun Oct 04, 2015 11:34 am

7: Dornier Do 31

Image

The Dornier Do 31 was a West German experimental VTOL jet transport built by Dornier. The Do 31 was designed to meet a NATO specification (NBMR-4) for a tactical support aircraft for the EWR VJ 101 VTOL strike aircraft designed under the NATO contract of BMR-3.[1] The project was cancelled in 1970 owing to high costs, technical problems and a change of requirement.

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#9

Postby johntrekker » Sun Oct 04, 2015 11:41 am

8: Dornier Aerodyne

Image

The Dornier Aerodyne was the designation of an unmanned "wingless" VTOL aircraft. Conceived by Alexander Lippisch, it was developed and built by Dornier on behalf of the Federal German Ministry of Defense. Lippisch was part of the team. The first flight took place on 18 September 1972. The development ended on 30 November 1972 after successful hovering-flight testing with the aircraft. Experimentation did not continue due to lack of interest in the Bundeswehr (German Armed Forces), and/or the desire to undertake plans for manned helicopters.

Enuf Sed
Engine Starting Poster
Posts: 51
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2015 1:20 pm
Location: Cape Town
South Africa

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#10

Postby Enuf Sed » Sun Oct 04, 2015 2:41 pm

When looking at the Dornier Aerodyne, you have to ask: What were they smoking? But then again, we stand where we are in aviation today because of designs like these. I say Mazel Tov :cool2:

User avatar
Snor
The Richard Pryor of Rugby
Posts: 65
Joined: Sat Jul 07, 2012 4:05 am
Location: In Paarl sonder werk!

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#11

Postby Snor » Sun Oct 04, 2015 3:40 pm

Heyneke must have been involved in that design.

User avatar
Moertoe Pilut
2000 feet Poster
Posts: 2914
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2012 12:00 am
Location: In a cockpit....
Contact:
Netherlands

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#12

Postby Moertoe Pilut » Sun Oct 04, 2015 7:18 pm

I think number 8 is a winner, so far the most ridiculous "airplane" I have seen... :thumbs:

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#13

Postby johntrekker » Sun Oct 04, 2015 7:41 pm

9: Blériot III

Image

The Blériot III was an early French aeroplane built by pioneer aviators Louis Blériot and Gabriel Voisin. It was later modified and renamed the Blériot IV, but both versions failed to fly.

The Blériot III was radically different from what was to became the orthodox design for aircraft, having two large elliptical closed wing cells in tandem connected by booms. A single transversely mounted 24 hp (18 kW) Antoinette engine mounted on the lower front wing drove two tractor propellers using flexible drive shafts incorporating reduction gearing to reduce the 1,800 rpm of the engine to 600 rpm. The transmission arrangement accounted for 100 kg of the aircraft's 400 kg weight. The undercarriage consisted of a pair of long floats under the front wing cell and a third below the aft wing cell. Blériot and Voisin attempted to fly it from the Lac d'Engheim in May 1906, but the machine would not become airborne

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#14

Postby johntrekker » Sun Oct 04, 2015 8:01 pm

10: Stits SA-2A Sky Baby


Image


The Stits SA-2A Sky Baby was a home built aircraft designed for the challenge of claiming the title of "The World's Smallest"

The Sky Baby was designed by Ray Stits and built with Bob Starr as a follow-on to the Stits Junior midget racer. The aircraft is an enclosed single engine negative staggered cantilevered biplane with conventional landing gear. The fuselage is constructed of welded steel tubing with aircraft fabric covering. The upper wings have flaps, the lower wings have ailerons. Most aircraft use a flat firewall between the engine and pilot's feet, the Skybaby is configured with the pilot sitting with the engine close to the lap, and rudder pedals located under the oil sump toward the front of the cowling. The powerplant was a sourced from an ERCO Ercoupe, modified with water injection to produce 112 hp (84 kW).

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#15

Postby johntrekker » Mon Oct 05, 2015 5:05 pm

11: The Northrop XP-79

Image

The Northrop XP-79 was an ambitious design for a flying wing fighter aircraft, designed by Northrop. It had several notable design features; among these, the pilot would operate the aircraft from a prone position, permitting the pilot to withstand much greater g-forces in the upward and downward direction with respect to the plane – and welded magnesium monocoque structure instead of riveted aluminum.

In 1942, John K. Northrop conceived the XP-79 as a high-speed rocket-powered flying-wing fighter aircraft.

In January 1943, a contract for two prototypes (s/n's 43-52437 & 43-52438) with designation XP-79 was issued by the United States Army Air Forces.

To test the radical design, glider prototypes were built. One, designated MX-324, was towed into the air on 5 July 1944 by a P-38, making it the first US-built rocket-powered aircraft to fly.

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#16

Postby johntrekker » Mon Oct 05, 2015 5:11 pm

12: CCW-5 Channel Wing

Image


The Custer Channel Wing was a series of American-built experimental aircraft designs of the 1940s and 1950s incorporating a half-barrel shaped section to each wing.

Willard Custer filed a United States patent in 1929 for a wing design incorporating a semi-circular channel or "half barrel" shape in which an engine was to be fitted in pusher mode. Custer claimed that this layout, the channel wing, which gave STOL operating capabilities, resulted in a design "which is an aircraft not an airplane. It does not plane the air to fly, rather it brings the air to the lift surfaces and reduces pressure to fly at 8 to 11 mph"[

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#17

Postby johntrekker » Tue Oct 06, 2015 7:04 pm

13: RFB X-114

Image


The RFB X-114 was a ground effect craft, designed chiefly to operate over water but capable of flight at higher altitudes where required, carrying five or six passengers or freight along coasts and capable of surveillance duties. One was evaluated by the German military in the late 1970s but no orders followed.

The RFB X-114 Aerofoil Craft was an experimental ground effect vehicle intended to work over water, with the ability to fly out of ground effect when required. It was the last of three such aircraft designed by Alexander Lippisch in the 1960s and early 1970s. The low powered, two seat proof of concept Collins X-112 was followed by the RFB X-113, structurally and aerodynamically refined but still low powered. The much larger X-114 seated six or seven and had a 149 kW (200 hp) engine.

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#18

Postby johntrekker » Thu Oct 08, 2015 3:44 pm

14: Arpin A-1

Image

The Arpin A-1 was a two seat low-wing monoplane which was powered by a single radial engine in pusher configuration, mounted behind the cabin between twin booms that carried the tail. An unconventional fixed tricycle undercarriage was fitted. Only one was built.

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#19

Postby johntrekker » Thu Oct 08, 2015 3:50 pm

15: Blohm & Voss BV 141

Image

The Blohm & Voss BV 141 was a World War II German tactical reconnaissance aircraft. It is notable for its uncommon structural asymmetry. Although the Blohm & Voss BV 141 performed well, it was never ordered into full-scale production, for reasons that included the unavailability of the preferred engine and competition from another tactical reconnaissance aircraft, the Focke-Wulf Fw 189.

In 1937, the German Air Ministry – the Reichsluftfahrtministerium (RLM) – issued a specification for a single-engine reconnaissance aircraft with optimal visual characteristics. The preferred contractors were Arado with the Ar 198, but the prototype proved unsuccessful.The eventual winner was the Focke-Wulf Fw 189 Uhu; even though its twin-boom design using two smaller engines did not match the requirement of a single engined aircraft. Blohm & Voss (Hamburger Flugzeugbau) although not invited to participate, pursued as a private venture something far more radical.The proposal of chief designer Dr. Richard Vogt was the uniquely asymmetric BV 141.

User avatar
johntrekker
Engine Run Up Poster
Posts: 298
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Op my trekker

Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#20

Postby johntrekker » Thu Oct 08, 2015 4:39 pm

16: The Convair XFY Pogo

Image

The Convair XFY Pogo tailsitter was an experiment in vertical takeoff and landing. The Pogo had delta wings and three-bladed contra-rotating propellers powered by a 5,500 hp (4,100 kW) Allison YT40-A-16 turboprop engine. It was intended to be a high-performance fighter aircraft capable of operating from small warships. Landing the XFY-1 was difficult, as the pilot had to look over his shoulder while carefully working the throttle to land.

After World War II, the Cold War prompted the United States Army and Navy to study VTOL operations. It was envisaged to protect task forces, convoys or any fleet, even without aircraft carriers, by placing VTOLs on any ship. These fighters would be housed within a conical protective housing, saving limited deck space available aboard ships. They would provide first line of airborne defense and reconnaissance capability, before more aircraft could be scrambled to help.


Return to “John Trekker s'n Hoekie”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest