25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

Adult humour. Aircraft/cockpit guess quizzes.
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Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#21

Post by Bell 407 » Thu Oct 08, 2015 4:51 pm

Well No.11 takes the cake for me :wacko:



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Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#22

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Thu Oct 08, 2015 5:30 pm

I'd say any airplane that Alexander Lippisch was involved with....That man must have been on a permanent high....



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Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#23

Post by johntrekker » Sat Oct 17, 2015 1:07 pm

17: Kalinin K-7


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The Kalinin K-7 was a heavy experimental aircraft designed and tested in the Soviet Union in the early 1930s. It was of unusual configuration with twin booms and large underwing pods housing fixed landing gear and machine gun turrets. In the passenger version, seats were arranged inside the 2.3-meter thick (7 ft 7 in) wings. The airframe was welded from KhMA chrome-molybdenum steel. The original design called for six engines in the wing leading edge but when the projected loaded weight was exceeded, two more engines were added to the trailing edges of the wing, one right and one left of the central passenger pod. Nemecek states in his book that at first only one further pusher engine was added



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Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#24

Post by johntrekker » Sat Oct 17, 2015 1:10 pm

18: Fairchild VZ-5


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Built for the United States Army with the designation VZ-5 was one of a series of experimental aircraft designed to investigate various aspects and solutions for VTOL aircraft. The VZ-5 was an all-metal high-wing monoplane with a fixed tricycle undercarriage. The fuselage had an open cockpit for one pilot and a rear-mounted high-tailplane. The unusual aspect of the aircraft was that it had one General Electric turboshaft in the rear fuselage driving four propellers, two each mounted in nacelles on the leading edge of each wing. It also had two small four-bladed tail-rotors mounted above the tailplane for control. The wing had conventional trailing edge flaps and ailerons but it also had a section of the wing that could be deflected to act as a full-span flap. For a vertical takeoff two-thirds of the wing chord acted as a flap in the slipstream of the four propellers.

The VZ-5 was first flown tethered on 18 November 1959 but only had limited testing before the project was abandoned. Also see Deflected slipstream for information on the VTOL technology employed with the VZ-5.



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Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#25

Post by johntrekker » Mon Oct 19, 2015 8:19 pm

19: Beechcraft Starship


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Development of the Starship began in 1979 when Beech decided to explore designs for a successor to its King Air line of turboprops that would fly faster and carry more passengers. The design was originated by Beechcraft in January 1980 as Preliminary Design 330 (PD 330). On August 25, 1982, Beech contracted with Scaled Composites to refine the design and build an 85% scale proof-of-concept (POC) aircraft. One of the significant changes made to the design by Scaled Composites was the addition of variable geometry to the canard



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Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#26

Post by johntrekker » Mon Oct 19, 2015 8:24 pm

20: Short L.17 Scylla


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The Short L.17 Scylla was a British four-engined 39-seat biplane airliner designed and built by Short Brothers at the request of Imperial Airways to supplement the Handley Page H.P.42 fleet already in service after Handley Page quoted an excessive price for two additional H.P.42s.

Imperial Airways used the Scylla for scheduled flights from London to Paris and other European cities. Two aircraft were built, Scylla (G-ACJJ) and Syrinx (G-ACJK). Both served with the airline until its merger into BOAC in 1939 and both were taken out of service the following year.



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Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#27

Post by johntrekker » Mon Oct 19, 2015 8:45 pm

21: DLR HY4


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With the project for the HY4 four-seater aircraft, the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) is taking another major step towards making zero-emission flying a reality – the HY4 will be the world's first four-passenger aircraft powered solely by a hydrogen fuel cell battery system. "With the HY4, we want to bring electromobility to the air, demonstrating the feasibility of this technology and identifying specific fields of application in passenger transport," explained DLR Coordinator of Electrical Aviation Josef Kallo, during the official presentation of the project at the International Trade Fair World of Energy Solutions on 12 October 2015 in Stuttgart.



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Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#28

Post by johntrekker » Thu Oct 22, 2015 3:10 pm

22: Piaggio P.180 Avanti


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Design studies began in 1979 and designs were tested in wind tunnels in Italy and the United States in 1980 and 1981. A collaboration with Learjet to develop the aircraft began in 1983 but ended on 13 January 1986, with Piaggio continuing development on its own. The first prototype flew on 23 September 1986. American and Italian certification was obtained on 2 October 1990. Learjet's influence can be seen in the two "delta fins" mounted on the bottom of the tail, as found on most Learjets; these devices help provide yaw stability and pitch stability at high angles of attack



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Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#29

Post by johntrekker » Thu Oct 22, 2015 3:15 pm

23: Grumman X-29


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The Grumman X-29 was an American experimental aircraft that tested a forward-swept wing, canard control surfaces, and other novel aircraft technologies. The X-29 was developed by Grumman, and the two built were flown by NASA and the United States Air Force. The aerodynamic instability of the X-29's airframe required the use of computerized fly-by-wire control. Composite materials were used to control the aeroelastic divergent twisting experienced by forward-swept wings, and to reduce weight. The X-29 first flew in 1984; two X-29s were flight tested over the next decade.



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Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#30

Post by johntrekker » Mon Nov 02, 2015 7:38 pm

24: Vought V173


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The Vought V-173 "Flying Pancake" designed by Charles H. Zimmerman was an American experimental test aircraft built as part of the Vought XF5U "Flying Flapjack" World War II United States Navy fighter aircraft program.

Both the V-173 and the XF5U featured an unorthodox "all-wing" design consisting of flat, somewhat disk-shaped bodies (hence the name) serving as the lifting surface. Two piston engines buried in the body drove propellers located on the leading edge at the wingtips



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Re: 25 Weirdest airplanes ever built

#31

Post by johntrekker » Mon Nov 02, 2015 8:24 pm

25: Sud-Ouest SO.6000 Triton


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The Sud-Ouest SO.6000 Triton was the first French jet aircraft to be manufactured and was completed during the 1940s by SNCASO. The SO.6000 design began in 1943, as a clandestine project due to the German occupation, under engineer Lucien Servanty. Shortly after the war, the French government required five prototypes to be built.



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