An uncommon sight in Europe's skies

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pampa14
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An uncommon sight in Europe's skies

#1

Post by pampa14 » Sun Nov 15, 2015 6:32 pm

I share with you an interesting collection of pictures showing one of the projects launched at the end of World War II by Germany as part of its war effort to try to avoid the increasingly Allied bombing. The big question remains whether this rocket plane had been built in greater quantities and earlier would have changed the final outcome? What do you think? Visit the link below, see photos and give your opinion about it.


http://aviacaoemfloripa.blogspot.com.br/2011/01/uma-visao-incomum-nos-ceus-da-europa.html


Best Regards.



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Moertoe Pilut
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Re: An uncommon sight in Europe's skies

#2

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Sun Nov 15, 2015 7:14 pm

I think that "thing" wouldn't have done much. It's rocket launched but the "thing" doesn't really show that it can actually fly, let alone land again. Please correct me if I'm wrong but that means that every launch results more or less in a haul loss?



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Moertoe Pilut
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Re: An uncommon sight in Europe's skies

#3

Post by Moertoe Pilut » Sun Nov 15, 2015 8:37 pm

After searching around what this "thing" is or was I found this:

The Bachem Ba 349 Natter (English: Colubrid, grass-snake[1]) was a World War II German point-defence rocket-powered interceptor, which was to be used in a very similar way to a manned surface-to-air missile. After a vertical take-off, which eliminated the need for airfields, most of the flight to the Allied bombers was to be controlled by an autopilot. The primary role of the relatively untrained pilot was to aim the aircraft at its target bomber and fire its armament of rockets. The pilot and the fuselage containing the rocket-motor would then land using separate parachutes, while the nose section was disposable. The only manned vertical take-off flight on 1 March 1945 ended in the death of the test pilot, Lothar Sieber.



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