Cirrus SR22 safety

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Raffles
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Cirrus SR22 safety

#1

Postby Raffles » Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:26 am

I spoke to an owner at Springs about the SR22 from a safety point of view since there are many "experts" on "other" forums who blame the plane as being unforgiving resulting in many accidents. He shot them down in flames saying that the aircraft is very safe.

I will try gather factual reports and post them here to test the two camps.

Firstly ASN lists 180 occurrences since 1982.

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#2

Postby Raffles » Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:36 am

Here is one such accident and pilot error is listed as the probable cause on the NTSB website

NTSB Identification: CEN13FA558
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 25, 2013 in Bolingbrook, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/27/2014
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20, registration: N406DC
Injuries: 2 Fatal.
NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane was captured on airport surveillance cameras as the pilot attempted to land. A review of the video revealed that the airplane touched down multiple times about halfway down the runway. During the go-around, witnesses reported that they observed the airplane depart the runway and make a left turn at low altitude. The airplane descended with the wings level as it flew over a few buildings. The airplane then struck a tree and a light pole, and then impacted terrain next to a bank building. A postimpact fire ensued and consumed most of the airplane. The slash marks found in the dirt next to the main wreckage were consistent with the propeller rotating at the time of impact. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.
The substances found in the pilot’s toxicology report were consistent with a resuscitation effort. Based on the available medical history, physical examinations, toxicology and autopsy, the pilot had no known or reported pre-existing medical issues that would have posed a hazard to flight safety.
A witness who spoke with the pilot immediately after the accident stated that the pilot told him that the airplane’s speed was too fast (witnesses stated that he was landing with a tailwind), so he decided to go around and attempt the landing again. He then stated that as he was banking, he lost power and control of the aircraft. Based on the evidence, it is likely that the pilot lost control of the airplane during the go-around and subsequently impacted terrain.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane during a go-around.

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#3

Postby Raffles » Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:37 am

There was a fatal crash in a SR22 at Lanseria a while back, is the report out yet? :anyone:

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#4

Postby Bell 407 » Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:42 am

Been some discussion on the other site about the long delays in the release of reports from the CAA :mail:

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#5

Postby Raffles » Fri Sep 04, 2015 7:42 pm

This crash reported in this topic happened in VMC conditions. The preliminary report is out.

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA330
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 27, 2015 in Alabaster, AL
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N1116C
Injuries: 1 Fatal.
This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 27, 2015, about 1906 central daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N1116C, was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain while on the final leg of the traffic pattern at Shelby County Airport (EET), Alabaster, Alabama. The airplane was owned by Hard Times LLC and operated by a private individual. The private pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the personal flight. The flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated from Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport (BHM), Birmingham, Alabama, about 1830.

According to witnesses, the airplane was flying "very low" on the final leg of the traffic pattern and then it descended "straight down." In addition, it sounded like the airplane was having "throttle issues," and the engine noise "just stopped."

According to first responders, after impacting the ground, a postimpact fire ensued, and the ballistic parachute system rocket was seen and heard launching out of the wreckage a few minutes after the impact.

The main wreckage was located about 1700 feet from the approach end of the runway on the extended centerline. The airplane impacted several trees that were approximately 40 feet tall prior to impacting the ground. The airplane came to rest in a nose down attitude about 10 feet from the initial tree strikes. A postimpact fire ensued, which partially consumed the wings, fuselage, and empennage. All components of the airplane were located in the immediate vicinity of the wreckage. In addition, control continuity was established from all flight control surfaces to their respective cockpit controls through impact fractures and separations.

The engine remained attached to the fuselage and exhibited thermal damage near Cylinder No. 2. The propeller was impact separated from the crankshaft at the propeller flange, and exhibited chordwise scratching, tip tearing, and leading edge gouges on the blades.

The engine was retained for further examination. In addition, the Avidyne primary flight display, multifunction display, and DFC 90 Autopilot were retained and sent to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory for data download.

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#6

Postby Moertoe Pilut » Sun Sep 06, 2015 6:43 pm

I don't think its the airplane but more the incapability of some pilots....What do they expect, if manure hits the fan just pull the ripcord and all will be fine?

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Emirates Selects Cirrus SR22 for Pilot Training

#7

Postby Les Nessman » Wed Nov 11, 2015 5:37 pm

Emirates Selects Cirrus SR22 for Pilot Training

By Stephen Pope / Published: Nov 10, 2015

Emirates Flight Training Academy, the flight training organization operated by Dubai-based airline Emirates, has selected the Cirrus SR22 for its primary training aircraft fleet, the companies announced at this week's Dubai Airshow. Cirrus will supply 22 airplanes for the training program at Al Maktoum International-Dubai World Central Airport in support of the Emirates' National Cadet Pilot Programme....

Read more...Flying Magazine

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#8

Postby Bell 407 » Thu Nov 12, 2015 7:27 am

Plane parachutes to safety on Arkansas road - Video

Video shot by @fredjackturner, shows the moment a small plane parachutes to earth onto a main road, Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The plane slowly falls to the ground using a ballistic parachute. The three people on board the plane escape with minor injuries, however the plane was struck by a lorry on the road after the landing.

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#9

Postby Enuf Sed » Sat Nov 14, 2015 7:07 am

Bell 407 wrote:... however the plane was struck by a lorry on the road after the landing.

Look, this is no laughing matter but seriously. You parachute down safely only to get hit by a lorry. Karma? :faceplant:

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#10

Postby Raffles » Wed Nov 18, 2015 9:12 pm

Another Cirrus crash...

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA034
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, November 09, 2015 in Colorado Springs, CO
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N752C
Injuries: 2 Fatal.
This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 9, 2015, about 1055 mountain standard time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22, N752C, was destroyed when it impacted terrain north of the City of Colorado Springs Municipal Airport (KCOS), Colorado Springs, Colorado. A post impact fire ensued. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Linkup Aviation LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and was en route to Roanoke, Texas.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot had received clearance to depart from runway 35L. Shortly after takeoff the pilot reported that he had lost engine power. One witness described hearing the engine surge during the takeoff. Several other witnesses described seeing the airplane wing's rock back and forth before the airplane "spiraled" to the ground.

The airplane came to rest in a field ½ mile north of the departure end of runway 35L. The wreckage included the fuselage, empennage, both wings, and the engine and propeller assembly. The airplane was damaged by the impact and the post-crash fire.
The closest official weather reporting station, located at KCOS, recorded the wind at 200 degrees at 8 knots, sky condition broken clouds at 2,300 feet, temperature 14 degrees Celsius, dewpoint -13 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.99.

NTSB

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CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22T 1 fatal Tuesday, January 26, 2016 in Xenia, OH

#11

Postby Raffles » Wed Feb 24, 2016 4:12 pm

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA095
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, January 26, 2016 in Xenia, OH
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22T, registration: N1703
Injuries: 1 Fatal.
This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 26, 2016, about 1800 eastern standard time, a Cirrus Design Corp SR22 single engine airplane, N1703, registered to Weaver LLC of Indianapolis, Indiana, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during final approach to runway 25 at the Greene County - Lewis A Jackson Regional Airport (I19), Xenia, Ohio. The pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed in the area during the approach. The positioning flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91 and an IFR flight plan was filed. The flight originated about 1700 from the Indianapolis Executive Airport (TYQ), Indianapolis, Indiana, and I19 was its planned destination.

The purpose of the flight was to reposition the airplane to its home base of Xenia, Ohio, after completed maintenance at a repair station. Information provided by the FQAA showed that the pilot filed an IFR flight plan from TYQ, flying at 9,000 feet enroute to I19. After a normal IFR flight from TYQ, the pilot requested and was given clearance to fly the RNAV 7 instrument approach to I19. The airplane broke out of the cloud base, and the pilot canceled his IFR clearance. An airport employee, who witnessed the airplane flying on a downwind beneath the cloud base, stated that the airplane appeared to be setting up for a circling VMC approach to runway 25. The airport employee was in proximity to the I19 Automated Weather Observation System (AWOS) weather information screen. He reported that the screen showed a 1,700 cloud ceiling, with wind from 240 degrees at 9 knots, gusting to 14 knots (gusts variable from 240 to 330 degrees). Several other witnesses who were in vehicles on roadways near the airport reported that they saw the airplane appear to start a left base turn to final and then nose down prior to the runway 25 threshold.

There were no reported distress calls from the pilot during the flight and the pilot had normal communications with ATC and ground personnel throughout the flight.

The airplane wreckage was found in a lightly wooded ravine about 300 feet short of the runway 25 threshold, approximately on bearing with the runway. Evidence at the accident site were consistent with a nose down impact. The airplane was equipped with a Ballistic Recovery System (BRS). Evidence at the accident site showed that the BRS system was not activated in flight. The charge cartridge for the parachute deployment mechanism was found expended, due to impact forces.

NTSB

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#12

Postby Raffles » Wed Mar 02, 2016 7:03 pm

A very sad occurrence a few days ago near Houston. As soon as the NTSB preliminary report comes out I will post it.

From ASN : https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/wiki.php?id=185005

ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 185005
Last updated: 2 March 2016
This information is added by users of ASN. Neither ASN nor the Flight Safety Foundation are responsible for the completeness or correctness of this information. If you feel this information is incomplete or incorrect, you can submit corrected information.

Date: 28-FEB-2016
Time: 9:50
Type:
Cirrus SR20
Owner/operator: Air Akhtar Heating and Air Conditioning LLC
Registration: N477TC
C/n / msn: 1378
Fatalities: Fatalities: 4 / Occupants: 4
Other fatalities: 0
Airplane damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location: Near Navasota Municipal Airport (60R), Navasota, TX - United States of America
Phase: Approach
Nature: Private
Departure airport: David Wayne Hooks Mem (KDWH)
Destination airport: Navasota Muni (60R)
Narrative:
The aircraft impacted wooded terrain southeast of Navasota Municipal Airport (60R), Navasota, Texas. The airplane sustained unreported damage and the four occupants onboard received fatal injuries.

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#13

Postby Raffles » Thu Mar 10, 2016 8:13 pm

The latest Cirrus incident happily no injuries.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9ebvA3ELv4

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#14

Postby Raffles » Sun Aug 14, 2016 2:36 am

Cirrus incident, engine failure, BRS deployed but plane caught fire as it touched powerlines, everyone survived.

Report at ASN

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#15

Postby Bell 407 » Sun Aug 14, 2016 8:53 am

Raffles wrote:Cirrus incident, engine failure, BRS deployed but plane caught fire as it touched powerlines, everyone survived.

Glad to hear that. Powerlines are nasty :thinking:

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#16

Postby Raffles » Sun Sep 17, 2017 6:26 am

Another SR22 crash yesterday:

From ASN:

Date: 16-SEP-2017
Time:
Type: Cirrus SR22
Owner/operator:
Registration:
C/n / msn:
Fatalities: Fatalities: 4 / Occupants: 4
Other fatalities: 0
Airplane damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location: near Baxter Peak, 15 miles north of Glenwood Springs, Colorado - United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:
Departure airport: Fort Collins
Destination airport: Moab, Utah
Narrative:
The aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances shortly after air traffic lost contact with the plane.
4 occupants, a family, two adults and two children, died in the accident.
Wreakage of th plane was found around 11:40, the 16. There was a large debris field.

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#17

Postby Bell 407 » Sun Sep 17, 2017 9:03 am

No chance of the parachute deploying then?

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Re: Cirrus SR22 safety

#18

Postby Raffles » Mon Sep 18, 2017 6:18 pm

Large debris field indicates it broke up in the air. If I remember, I will look for the preliminary report as it usually takes about 2 weeks to come out.


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